Configuring ejabberd


Here are the main entry points to learn more about ejabberd configuration. ejabberd is extremely powerful and can be configured in many ways with many options.

Do not let this complexity scare you. Most of you will be fine with default config file (or light changes).

Config File Formatting

Yaml Configuration File Format

The configuration file will be loaded the first time you start ejabberd. The configuration file name MUST have “.yml” or “.yaml” extension. This helps ejabberd to differentiate between the new and legacy file formats (see section Legacy Configuration File).

The configuration file is written in YAML. However, different scalars are treated as different types:

  • unquoted or single-quoted strings. The type is called atom() in this document. Examples: dog, 'Jupiter', '3.14159', YELLOW.

  • numeric literals. The type is called integer(), float() or, if both are allowed, number(). Examples: 3, -45.0, .0

  • double-quoted or folded strings. The type is called string(). Examples of a double-quoted string: "Lizzard", "orange", "3.14159". Examples of a folded string:

    > Art thou not Romeo,
      and a Montague?
    
    | Neither, fair saint,
      if either thee dislike.
    

    For associative arrays (“mappings”) and lists you can use both outline indentation and compact syntax (aka “JSON style”). For example, the following is equivalent:

    {param1: ["val1", "val2"], param2: ["val3", "val4"]}
    

    and

    param1:
      - "val1"
      - "val2"
    param2:
      - "val3"
      - "val4"
    

    Note that both styles are used in this document.

Note that ejabberd never edits the configuration file. If you are changing parameter from web admin interface, you will need to apply them to configuration file manually. This is to prevent messing up with your config file comments, syntax, etc.

Please, consult ejabberd.log for configuration errors. ejabberd will report syntax related errors, as well as complains about unknown options. The later error typically looks like this:

17:10:52.858 [error] unknown option 'db_typ' for module 'mod_roster' will be likely ignored, available options are: 'access', 'db_type', 'iqdisc', 'managers', 'store_current_id', 'versioning'

Unknown options are not ignored at the moment in order to make legacy third-party modules work. Make sure you respect indentation (YAML is sensitive to this) or you will get pretty cryptic errors.

Legacy Configuration File

In previous ejabberd version the configuration file should be written in Erlang terms. The format is still supported, but it is highly recommended to convert it to the new YAML format using convert_to_yaml command from ejabberdctl (see ejabberdctl and List of ejabberd Commands for details).

If you want to specify some options using the old Erlang format, you can set them in an additional cfg file, and include it using the include_config_file option, see Include Additional Configuration Files for the option description and a related example in Restrict Execution with AccessCommands.

If you just want to provide an erlang term inside an option, you can use the > erlangterm. syntax for embedding erlang terms in a YAML file, for example:

modules:
  mod_cron:
    tasks:
      - time: 10
        units: seconds
        module: mnesia
        function: info
        arguments: "> []."
      - time: 3
        units: seconds
        module: ejabberd_auth
        function: try_register
        arguments: "> [\"user1\", \"localhost\", \"pass\"]."

Configuring One or Several XMPP Domains

Host Names

ejabberd supports managing several independant XMPP domains on a single ejabberd instance, using a feature called virtual hosting.

The option hosts defines a list containing one or more domains that ejabberd will serve.

Of course, the hosts list can contain just one domain if you do not want to host multiple XMPP domains on the same instance.

The syntax is: ["HostName1", "Hostname2"]

Examples:

  • Serving one domain:

    hosts: ["example.org"]
    
  • Serving three domains:

    hosts:
      - "example.net"
      - "example.com"
      - "jabber.somesite.org"
    

Virtual Hosting

When managing several XMPP domains in a single instance, those domains are truly independant. It means they can even have different configuration parameters.

Options can be defined separately for every virtual host using the host_config option.

The syntax is: {HostName: [Option, ...]}

Examples:

  • Domain example.net is using the internal authentication method while domain example.com is using the LDAP server running on the domain localhost to perform authentication:

    host_config:
      "example.net"
        auth_method: internal
      "example.com":
        auth_method: ldap
        ldap_servers:
          - "localhost"
        ldap_uids:
          - "uid"
        ldap_rootdn: "dc=localdomain"
        ldap_rootdn: "dc=example,dc=com"
        ldap_password: ""
    
  • Domain example.net is using SQL to perform authentication while domain example.com is using the LDAP servers running on the domains localhost and otherhost:

    host_config:
      "example.net":
        auth_method: sql
        sql_type: odbc
        sql_server: "DSN=ejabberd;UID=ejabberd;PWD=ejabberd"
      "example.com":
        auth_method: ldap
        ldap_servers:
          - "localhost"
          - "otherhost"
        ldap_uids:
          - "uid"
        ldap_rootdn: "dc=localdomain"
        ldap_rootdn: "dc=example,dc=com"
        ldap_password: ""
    

To define specific ejabberd modules in a virtual host, you can define the global modules option with the common modules, and later add specific modules to certain virtual hosts. To accomplish that, instead of defining each option in host_config use append_host_config with the same syntax.

In this example three virtual hosts have some similar modules, but there are also other different modules for some specific virtual hosts:

## This ejabberd server has three vhosts:
hosts:
  - "one.example.org"
  - "two.example.org"
  - "three.example.org"

## Configuration of modules that are common to all vhosts
modules:
  mod_roster:    {}
  mod_configure: {}
  mod_disco:     {}
  mod_private:   {}
  mod_time:      {}
  mod_last:      {}
  mod_version:   {}

## Add some modules to vhost one:
append_host_config:
  "one.example.org":
    modules:
      mod_echo:
        host: "echo-service.one.example.org"
      mod_http_bind: {}
      mod_logxml: {}

## Add a module just to vhost two:
append_host_config:
  "two.example.org":
    modules:
      mod_echo:
        host: "mirror.two.example.org"

Basic Configuration

Logging

ejabberd configuration can help a lot by having the right amount of logging set up.

Here is a few general option to configure logging:

loglevel: Number: Verbosity of log files generated by ejabberd. Available levels are.

  • 0: No ejabberd log at all (not recommended)
  • 1: Critical
  • 2: Error
  • 3: Warning
  • 4: Info
  • 5: Debug

log_rotate: size, date and count: The rotation parameters describe how to rotate logs. Either size and/or date can trigger log rotation. Setting count to N keeps N rotated logs. Setting count to 0 does not disable rotation, it instead rotates the file and keeps no previous versions around. Setting size to X rotate log when it reaches X bytes. To disable rotation set the size to 0 and the date to "" Date syntax is taken from the syntax newsyslog uses in newsyslog.conf.

Here are some examples:

  • \$D0 rotate every night at midnight
  • \$D23 rotate every day at 23:00 hr
  • \$W0D23 rotate every week on Sunday at 23:00 hr
  • \$W5D16 rotate every week on Friday at 16:00 hr
  • \$M1D0 rotate on the first day of every month at midnight
  • \$M5D6 rotate on every 5th day of the month at 6:00 hr

The values in default configuration file are:

log_rotate_size: 0
log_rotate_date: "\$D0"
log_rotate_count: 1

log_rate_limit: Number: This option is used for overload protection: If you want to limit the number of messages per second allowed from error_logger, which is a good idea if you want to avoid a flood of messages when system is overloaded, you can set a limit. Default value is 100.

For example:

log_rate_limit: 100

hide_sensitive_log_data: Boolean: We have a privacy option to ensure we do not log IP address or sensitive data. Default value is false for backward compatibility.

For example:

hide_sensitive_log_data: false

Listening Ports

The option listen defines for which ports, addresses and network protocols ejabberd will listen and what services will be run on them. Each element of the list is an associative array with the following elements:

  • Port number. Optionally also the IP address and/or a transport protocol.

  • Listening module that serves this port.

  • Options for the TCP socket and for the listening module.

The option syntax is:

[Listener, ...]:

Example:

listen:
  -
    port: 5222
    module: ejabberd_c2s
    starttls: true
    certfile: "/path/to/certfile.pem"
  -
    port: 5269
    module: ejabberd_s2s_in
    transport: tcp

Port Number, IP Address and Transport Protocol

The port number defines which port to listen for incoming connections. It can be a Jabber/XMPP standard port (see section Firewall Settings) or any other valid port number.

The IP address can be represented as a string. The socket will listen only in that network interface. It is possible to specify a generic address ("0.0.0.0" for IPv4 or "::" for IPv6), so ejabberd will listen in all addresses. Depending on the type of the IP address, IPv4 or IPv6 will be used. When the IP address is not specified, it will listen on all IPv4 network addresses.

Note that on some operating systems and/or OS configurations, listening on "::" will mean listening for IPv4 traffic as well as IPv6 traffic.

Some example values for IP address:

  • "0.0.0.0" to listen in all IPv4 network interfaces. This is the default value when no IP is specified.

  • "::" to listen in all IPv6 network interfaces

  • "10.11.12.13" is the IPv4 address 10.11.12.13

  • "::FFFF:127.0.0.1" is the IPv6 address ::FFFF:127.0.0.1/128

The transport protocol can be tcp or udp. Default is tcp.

Listening Module

The available modules, their purpose and the options allowed by each one are:

ejabberd_c2s: Handles c2s connections.
Options: access, certfile, ciphers, dhfile, protocol_options, max_ack_queue, max_fsm_queue, max_resume_timeout, max_stanza_size, resend_on_timeout, resume_timeout, shaper, starttls, starttls_required, stream_management, tls, zlib, tls_compression

ejabberd_s2s_in: Handles incoming s2s connections.
Options: max_stanza_size, shaper, tls_compression

ejabberd_service: Interacts with an external component (as defined in the Jabber Component Protocol (XEP-0114).
Options: access, hosts, max_fsm_queue, password, service_check_from, shaper_rule

ejabberd_sip: Handles SIP requests as defined in RFC 3261.
Options: certfile, tls

ejabberd_stun: Handles STUN/TURN requests as defined in RFC 5389 and RFC 5766.
Options: certfile, tls, use_turn, turn_ip, turn_port_range, turn_max_allocations, turn_max_permissions, shaper, server_name, auth_realm, auth_type

ejabberd_http: Handles incoming HTTP connections. This module is responsible for serving Web Admin, but also XMPP Bosh and Websocket with proper request handler configured. Options: captcha, certfile, default_host, dhfile, http_bind, request_handlers, tls, tls_compression, trusted_proxies (global option), web_admin

ejabberd_xmlrpc: Handles XML-RPC requests to execute ejabberd commands. Options: access_commands, maxsessions, timeout.
For explanations about access_commands see Restrict Execution with AccessCommands. Check some XML-RPC examples. You can find more information in the old ejabberd_xmlrpc documentation.

Options

This is a detailed description of each option allowed by the listening modules:

access: AccessName: This option defines access to the port. The default value is all.

backlog: Value: The backlog value defines the maximum length that the queue of pending connections may grow to. This should be increased if the server is going to handle lots of new incoming connections as they may be dropped if there is no space in the queue (and ejabberd was not able to accept them immediately). Default value is 5.

captcha: true|false: Simple web page that allows a user to fill a CAPTCHA challenge (see section CAPTCHA).

certfile: Path: Full path to a file containing the default SSL certificate. To define a certificate file specific for a given domain, use the global option domain_certfile.

ciphers: Ciphers: OpenSSL ciphers list in the same format accepted by ‘openssl ciphers’ command.

protocol_options: ProtocolOpts: List of general options relating to SSL/TLS. These map to OpenSSL’s set_options(). For a full list of options available in ejabberd, see the source. The default entry is: "no_sslv2"

default_host: undefined|HostName: If the HTTP request received by ejabberd contains the HTTP header Host with an ambiguous virtual host that doesn’t match any one defined in ejabberd (see Host Names), then this configured HostName is set as the request Host. The default value of this option is: undefined.

dhfile: Path: Full path to a file containing custom parameters for Diffie-Hellman key exchange. Such a file could be created with the command openssl dhparam -out dh.pem 2048. If this option is not specified, default parameters will be used, which might not provide the same level of security as using custom parameters.

hosts: {Hostname: [HostOption, ...]}: The external Jabber component that connects to this ejabberd_service can serve one or more hostnames. As HostOption you can define options for the component; currently the only allowed option is the password required to the component when attempt to connect to ejabberd: password: Secret. Note that you cannot define in a single ejabberd_service components of different services: add an ejabberd_service for each service, as seen in an example below. This option may not be necessary if the component already provides the host in its packets; in that case, you can simply provide the password option that will be used for all the hosts (see port 5236 definition in the example below).

http_bind: true|false: This option enables HTTP Binding (XEP-0124 and XEP-0206) support. HTTP Bind enables access via HTTP requests to ejabberd from behind firewalls which do not allow outgoing sockets on port 5222.

Remember that you must also install and enable the module
mod\_http\_bind.

If HTTP Bind is enabled, it will be available at
`http://server:port/http-bind/`. Be aware that support for HTTP Bind
is also needed in the XMPP client. Remark also that HTTP Bind can be
interesting to host a web-based XMPP client such as
[`JWChat`](http://jwchat.sourceforge.net/) (check the tutorials to
install JWChat with ejabberd and an
[`embedded local web server`](http://www.ejabberd.im/jwchat-localserver)
or [`Apache`](http://www.ejabberd.im/jwchat-apache)).

max_ack_queue: Size: This option specifies the maximum number of unacknowledged stanzas queued for possible retransmission if stream_management is enabled. When the limit is exceeded, the client session is terminated. This option can be specified for ejabberd_c2s listeners. The allowed values are positive integers and infinity. Default value: 1000.

max_fsm_queue: Size: This option specifies the maximum number of elements in the queue of the FSM (Finite State Machine). Roughly speaking, each message in such queues represents one XML stanza queued to be sent into its relevant outgoing stream. If queue size reaches the limit (because, for example, the receiver of stanzas is too slow), the FSM and the corresponding connection (if any) will be terminated and error message will be logged. The reasonable value for this option depends on your hardware configuration. However, there is no much sense to set the size above 1000 elements. This option can be specified for ejabberd_service and ejabberd_c2s listeners, or also globally for ejabberd_s2s_out. If the option is not specified for ejabberd_service or ejabberd_c2s listeners, the globally configured value is used. The allowed values are integers and ’undefined’. Default value: ’undefined’.

max_resume_timeout: Seconds: If stream_management is enabled, a client may specify the number of seconds until a session times out if the connection is lost. During this period of time, the client may resume the session. This option limits the number of seconds a client is permitted to request. It can be specified for ejabberd_c2s listeners, and it must be set to a number equal to or larger than the default resume_timeout (see below). By default, it is set to the same value as the resume_timeout option.

max_stanza_size: Size: This option specifies an approximate maximum size in bytes of XML stanzas. Approximate, because it is calculated with the precision of one block of read data. For example {max_stanza_size, 65536}. The default value is infinity. Recommended values are 65536 for c2s connections and 131072 for s2s connections. s2s max stanza size must always much higher than c2s limit. Change this value with extreme care as it can cause unwanted disconnect if set too low.

password: Secret: Specify the password to verify an external component that connects to the port.

request_handlers: {Path: Module}: To define one or several handlers that will serve HTTP requests. The Path is a string; so the URIs that start with that Path will be served by Module. For example, if you want mod_foo to serve the URIs that start with /a/b/, and you also want mod_http_bind to serve the URIs /http-bind/, use this option:

    request_handlers:
      "/a/b": mod_foo
      "/http-bind": mod_http_bind

resend_on_timeout: true|false|if_offline: If stream_management is enabled and this option is set to true, any message stanzas that weren’t acknowledged by the client will be resent on session timeout. This behavior might often be desired, but could have unexpected results under certain circumstances. For example, a message that was sent to two resources might get resent to one of them if the other one timed out. Therefore, the default value for this option is false, which tells ejabberd to generate an error message instead. As an alternative, the option may be set to if_offline. In this case, unacknowledged messages are resent only if no other resource is online when the session times out. Otherwise, error messages are generated. The option can be specified for ejabberd_c2s listeners.

resume_timeout: Seconds: This option configures the (default) number of seconds until a session times out if the connection is lost. During this period of time, a client may resume the session if stream_management is enabled. (Note that the client may request a different timeout value, see the max_resume_timeout option above.) This option can be specified for ejabberd_c2s listeners. Setting it to 0 effectively disables session resumption. The default value is 300.

service_check_from: true|false: This option can be used with ejabberd_service only. XEP-0114 requires that the domain must match the hostname of the component. If this option is set to false, ejabberd will allow the component to send stanzas with any arbitrary domain in the ’from’ attribute. Only use this option if you are completely sure about it. The default value is true, to be compliant with XEP-0114.

shaper: none|ShaperName: This option defines a shaper for the port (see section Shapers). The default value is none.

shaper_rule: none|ShaperRule: This option defines a shaper rule for the ejabberd_service (see section Shapers). The recommended value is fast.

starttls: true|false: This option specifies that STARTTLS encryption is available on connections to the port. You should also set the certfile option. You can define a certificate file for a specific domain using the global option domain_certfile.

starttls_required: true|false: This option specifies that STARTTLS encryption is required on connections to the port. No unencrypted connections will be allowed. You should also set the certfile option. You can define a certificate file for a specific domain using the global option domain_certfile.

stream_management: true|false: Setting this option to false disables ejabberd’s support for Stream Management (XEP-0198). It can be specified for ejabberd_c2s listeners. The default value is true.

timeout: Integer: Timeout of the connections, expressed in milliseconds. Default: 5000

tls: true|false: This option specifies that traffic on the port will be encrypted using SSL immediately after connecting. This was the traditional encryption method in the early Jabber software, commonly on port 5223 for client-to-server communications. But this method is nowadays deprecated and not recommended. The preferable encryption method is STARTTLS on port 5222, as defined RFC 6120: XMPP Core, which can be enabled in ejabberd with the option starttls. If this option is set, you should also set the certfile option. The option tls can also be used in ejabberd_http to support HTTPS.

tls_compression: true|false: Whether to enable or disable TLS compression. The default value is false.

web_admin: true|false: This option enables the Web Admin for ejabberd administration which is available at http://server:port/admin/. Login and password are the username and password of one of the registered users who are granted access by the ‘configure’ access rule.

zlib: true|false: This option specifies that Zlib stream compression (as defined in XEP-0138) is available on connections to the port.

There are some additional global options that can be specified in the ejabberd configuration file (outside listen):

s2s_use_starttls: false|optional|required|required_trusted: This option defines if s2s connections don’t use STARTTLS encryption; if STARTTLS can be used optionally; if STARTTLS is required to establish the connection; or if STARTTLS is required and the remote certificate must be valid and trusted. The default value is to not use STARTTLS: false.

s2s_certfile: Path: Full path to a file containing a SSL certificate.

s2s_dhfile: Path: Full path to a file containing custom DH parameters. Such a file could be created with the command openssl dhparam -out dh.pem 2048. If this option is not specified, default parameters will be used, which might not provide the same level of security as using custom parameters.

domain_certfile: Path: Full path to the file containing the SSL certificate for a specific domain.

s2s_ciphers: Ciphers: OpenSSL ciphers list in the same format accepted by ‘openssl ciphers’ command.

s2s_protocol_options: ProtocolOpts: List of general options relating to SSL/TLS. These map to OpenSSL’s set_options(). For a full list of options available in ejabberd, see the source. The default entry is: "no_sslv2"

outgoing_s2s_families: [Family, ...]: Specify which address families to try, in what order. By default it first tries connecting with IPv4, if that fails it tries using IPv6.

outgoing_s2s_timeout: Timeout: The timeout in milliseconds for outgoing S2S connection attempts.

s2s_access: Access: The policy for incoming and outgoing s2s connections to other XMPP servers. The default value is all.

s2s_dns_timeout: Timeout: The timeout in seconds for DNS resolving. The default value is 10.

s2s_dns_retries: Number: DNS resolving retries in seconds. The default value is 2.

s2s_max_retry_delay: Seconds: The maximum allowed delay for retry to connect after a failed connection attempt. Specified in seconds. The default value is 300 seconds (5 minutes).

s2s_tls_compression: true|false: Whether to enable or disable TLS compression for s2s connections. The default value is false.

max_fsm_queue: Size: This option specifies the maximum number of elements in the queue of the FSM (Finite State Machine). Roughly speaking, each message in such queues represents one XML stanza queued to be sent into its relevant outgoing stream. If queue size reaches the limit (because, for example, the receiver of stanzas is too slow), the FSM and the corresponding connection (if any) will be terminated and error message will be logged. The reasonable value for this option depends on your hardware configuration. However, there is no much sense to set the size above 1000 elements. This option can be specified for ejabberd_service and ejabberd_c2s listeners, or also globally for ejabberd_s2s_out. If the option is not specified for ejabberd_service or ejabberd_c2s listeners, the globally configured value is used. The allowed values are integers and ’undefined’. Default value: ’undefined’.

c2s_hibernate: Timeout|hibernate: The timeout in milliseconds before the c2s processes will be hibernated. Default value: ’90000’

receiver_hibernate: Timeout|hibernate: The timeout in milliseconds before the receiver processes will be hibernated. Default value: ’90000’

route_subdomains: local|s2s: Defines if ejabberd must route stanzas directed to subdomains locally (compliant with RFC 6120 Local Domain rules), or to foreign server using S2S (compliant with RFC 6120 Remote Domain rules).

trusted_proxies: all | [IpString]: Specify what proxies are trusted when an HTTP request contains the header X-Forwarded-For You can specify all to allow all proxies, or specify a list of IPs in string format. The default value is: ["127.0.0.1"]

Examples

For example, the following simple configuration defines:

  • There are three domains. The default certificate file is server.pem. However, the c2s and s2s connections to the domain example.com use the file example_com.pem.

  • Port 5222 listens for c2s connections with STARTTLS, and also allows plain connections for old clients.

  • Port 5223 listens for c2s connections with the old SSL.

  • Port 5269 listens for s2s connections with STARTTLS. The socket is set for IPv6 instead of IPv4.

  • Port 3478 listens for STUN requests over UDP.

  • Port 5280 listens for HTTP requests, and serves the HTTP-Bind (BOSH) service.

  • Port 5281 listens for HTTP requests, using HTTPS to serve HTTP-Bind (BOSH) and the Web Admin as explained in Managing: Web Admin. The socket only listens connections to the IP address 127.0.0.1.

    hosts:

    • "example.com"
    • "example.org"
    • "example.net"

    listen: - port: 5222 module: ejabberd_c2s access: c2s shaper: c2s_shaper starttls: true certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/server.pem" max_stanza_size: 65536 - port: 5223 module: ejabberd_c2s access: c2s shaper: c2s_shaper tls: true certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/server.pem" max_stanza_size: 65536 - port: 5269 ip: "::" module: ejabberd_s2s_in shaper: s2s_shaper max_stanza_size: 131072 - port: 3478 transport: udp module: ejabberd_stun - port: 5280 module: ejabberd_http http_bind: true - port: 5281 ip: "127.0.0.1" module: ejabberd_http web_admin: true http_bind: true tls: true certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/server.pem"

    s2s_use_starttls: optional s2s_certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/server.pem" host_config: "example.com": domain_certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/example_com.pem" outgoing_s2s_families: - ipv4 - ipv6 outgoing_s2s_timeout: 10000 trusted_proxies: ["127.0.0.1", "192.168.1.11"]

In this example, the following configuration defines that:

  • c2s connections are listened for on port 5222 (all IPv4 addresses) and on port 5223 (SSL, IP 192.168.0.1 and fdca:8ab6:a243:75ef::1) and denied for the user called ‘bad’.

  • s2s connections are listened for on port 5269 (all IPv4 addresses) with STARTTLS for secured traffic strictly required, and the certificates are verified. Incoming and outgoing connections of remote XMPP servers are denied, only two servers can connect: “jabber.example.org” and “example.com”.

  • Port 5280 is serving the Web Admin and the HTTP-Bind (BOSH) service in all the IPv4 addresses. Note that it is also possible to serve them on different ports. The second example in section Managing: Web Admin shows how exactly this can be done.

  • All users except for the administrators have a traffic of limit 1,000Bytes/second

  • The AIM transport aim.example.org is connected to port 5233 on localhost IP addresses (127.0.0.1 and ::1) with password ‘aimsecret’.

  • The ICQ transport JIT (icq.example.org and sms.example.org) is connected to port 5234 with password ‘jitsecret’.

  • The MSN transport msn.example.org is connected to port 5235 with password ‘msnsecret’.

  • The Yahoo! transport yahoo.example.org is connected to port 5236 with password ‘yahoosecret’.

  • The Gadu-Gadu transport gg.example.org is connected to port 5237 with password ‘ggsecret’.

  • The Jabber Mail Component jmc.example.org is connected to port 5238 with password ‘jmcsecret’.

  • The service custom has enabled the special option to avoiding checking the from attribute in the packets send by this component. The component can send packets in behalf of any users from the server, or even on behalf of any server.

    acl: blocked: user: "bad" trusted_servers: server: - "example.com" - "jabber.example.org" xmlrpc_bot: user: - "xmlrpc-robot": "example.org" shaper: normal: 1000 shaper_rules: c2s_shaper: - none: admin - normal access_rules: c2s: - deny: blocked - allow xmlrpc_access: - allow: xmlrpc_bot s2s: - allow: trusted_servers s2s_certfile: "/path/to/ssl.pem" s2s_access: s2s s2s_use_starttls: required_trusted listen: - port: 5222 module: ejabberd_c2s shaper: c2s_shaper access: c2s - ip: "192.168.0.1" port: 5223 module: ejabberd_c2s certfile: "/path/to/ssl.pem" tls: true access: c2s - ip: "FDCA:8AB6:A243:75EF::1" port: 5223 module: ejabberd_c2s certfile: "/path/to/ssl.pem" tls: true access: c2s - port: 5269 module: ejabberd_s2s_in - port: 5280 module: ejabberd_http web_admin: true http_bind: true - port: 4560 module: ejabberd_xmlrpc access_commands: {} - ip: "127.0.0.1" port: 5233 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "aim.example.org": password: "aimsecret" - ip: "::1" port: 5233 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "aim.example.org": password: "aimsecret" - port: 5234 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "icq.example.org": password: "jitsecret" "sms.example.org": password: "jitsecret" - port: 5235 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "msn.example.org": password: "msnsecret" - port: 5236 module: ejabberd_service password: "yahoosecret" - port: 5237 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "gg.example.org": password: "ggsecret" - port: 5238 module: ejabberd_service hosts: "jmc.example.org": password: "jmcsecret" - port: 5239 module: ejabberd_service service_check_from: false hosts: "custom.example.org": password: "customsecret"

Note, that for services based in jabberd14 or WPJabber you have to make the transports log and do XDB by themselves:

<!--
   You have to add elogger and rlogger entries here when using ejabberd.
   In this case the transport will do the logging.
-->

<log id='logger'>
  <host/>
  <logtype/>
  <format>%d: [%t] (%h): %s</format>
  <file>/var/log/jabber/service.log</file>
</log>

<!--
   Some XMPP server implementations do not provide
   XDB services (for example, jabberd2 and ejabberd).
   xdb_file.so is loaded in to handle all XDB requests.
-->

<xdb id="xdb">
  <host/>
  <load>
    <!-- this is a lib of wpjabber or jabberd14 -->
    <xdb_file>/usr/lib/jabber/xdb_file.so</xdb_file>
    </load>
  <xdb_file xmlns="jabber:config:xdb_file">
    <spool><jabberd:cmdline flag='s'>/var/spool/jabber</jabberd:cmdline></spool>
  </xdb_file>
</xdb>

Authentication

The option auth_method defines the authentication methods that are used for user authentication. The syntax is:

[Method, ...]

:

The following authentication methods are supported by ejabberd:

When the option is omitted, ejabberd will rely upon the default database which is configured in default_db option. If this option is not set neither the default authentication method will be internal.

Account creation is only supported by internal, external and sql methods.

The option resource_conflict defines the action when a client attempts to login to an account with a resource that is already connected. The option syntax is:

resource_conflict: setresource|closenew|closeold: The possible values match exactly the three possibilities described in XMPP Core: section 7.7.2.2. The default value is closeold. If the client uses old Jabber Non-SASL authentication (XEP-0078), then this option is not respected, and the action performed is closeold.

The option fqdn allows you to define the Fully Qualified Domain Name of the machine, in case it isn’t detected automatically. The FQDN is used to authenticate some clients that use the DIGEST-MD5 SASL mechanism. The option syntax is:

fqdn: undefined|FqdnString|[FqdnString]: The option disable_sasl_mechanisms specifies a list of SASL mechanisms (such as "DIGEST-MD5" or "SCRAM-SHA1") that should not be offered to the client. The mechanisms can be listed as lowercase or uppercase strings. The option syntax is:

disable_sasl_mechanisms: Mechanism|[Mechanism, ...]

Internal

ejabberd uses its internal Mnesia database as the default authentication method. The value internal will enable the internal authentication method.

The option auth_password_format: plain|scram defines in what format the users passwords are stored:

plain: The password is stored as plain text in the database. This is risky because the passwords can be read if your database gets compromised. This is the default value. This format allows clients to authenticate using: the old Jabber Non-SASL (XEP-0078), SASL PLAIN, SASL DIGEST-MD5, and SASL SCRAM-SHA-1.

scram: The password is not stored, only some information that allows to verify the hash provided by the client. It is impossible to obtain the original plain password from the stored information; for this reason, when this value is configured it cannot be changed to plain anymore. This format allows clients to authenticate using: SASL PLAIN and SASL SCRAM-SHA-1.

When you enable SCRAM password format for internal storage, if you try to authenticate a user that had his password already stored in plain text, his password will be automatically converted to SCRAM format. It means database is converted as you use it.

If you want to convert your Mnesia database all at once, you can look into the Erlang function: ejabberd_auth_internal:maybe_scram_passwords/0.

Examples:

  • To use internal authentication on example.org and LDAP authentication on example.net:

    host_config:
      "example.org":
        auth_method: [internal]
      "example.net":
        auth_method: [ldap]
    
  • To use internal authentication with hashed passwords on all virtual hosts:

    auth_method: internal
    auth_password_format: scram
    

Note on SCRAM using and foreign authentication limitations: when using the SCRAM password format, it is not possible to use foreign authentication method in ejabberd, as the real password is not known, Foreign authentication are use to authenticate through various bridges ejabberd provide. Foreign authentication includes at the moment SIP and TURN auth support and they will not be working with SCRAM.

External Script

In this authentication method, when ejabberd starts, it start a script, and calls it to perform authentication tasks.

The server administrator can write the external authentication script in any language. The details on the interface between ejabberd and the script are described in the ejabberd Developers Guide. There are also several example authentication scripts.

These are the specific options:

extauth_program: PathToScript: Indicate in this option the full path to the external authentication script. The script must be executable by ejabberd.

extauth_instances: Integer: Indicate how many instances of the script to run simultaneously to serve authentication in the virtual host. The default value is the minimum number: 1.

extauth_cache: false|CacheTimeInteger: The value false disables the caching feature, this is the default. The integer 0 (zero) enables caching for statistics, but doesn’t use that cached information to authenticate users. If another integer value is set, caching is enabled both for statistics and for authentication: the CacheTimeInteger indicates the number of seconds that ejabberd can reuse the authentication information since the user last disconnected, to verify again the user authentication without querying again the extauth script. Note: caching should not be enabled in a host if internal auth is also enabled. If caching is enabled, mod_last must be enabled also in that vhost.

This example sets external authentication, the extauth script, enables caching for 10 minutes, and starts three instances of the script for each virtual host defined in ejabberd:

auth_method: [external]
extauth_program: "/etc/ejabberd/JabberAuth.class.php"
extauth_cache: 600
extauth_instances: 3

Anonymous Login and SASL Anonymous

The anonymous authentication method enables two modes for anonymous authentication:

Anonymous login:: This is a standard login, that use the classical login and password mechanisms, but where password is accepted or preconfigured for all anonymous users. This login is compliant with SASL authentication, password and digest non-SASL authentication, so this option will work with almost all XMPP clients

SASL Anonymous:

: This is a special SASL authentication mechanism that allows to login without providing username or password (see XEP-0175). The main advantage of SASL Anonymous is that the protocol was designed to give the user a login. This is useful to avoid in some case, where the server has many users already logged or registered and when it is hard to find a free username. The main disavantage is that you need a client that specifically supports the SASL Anonymous protocol.

The anonymous authentication method can be configured with the following options. Remember that you can use the host_config option to set virtual host specific options (see section Virtual Hosting).

allow_multiple_connections: false|true: This option is only used when the anonymous mode is enabled. Setting it to true means that the same username can be taken multiple times in anonymous login mode if different resource are used to connect. This option is only useful in very special occasions. The default value is false.

anonymous_protocol: login_anon | sasl_anon | both: login_anon means that the anonymous login method will be used. sasl_anon means that the SASL Anonymous method will be used. both means that SASL Anonymous and login anonymous are both enabled.

Those options are defined for each virtual host with the host_config parameter (see section  Virtual Hosting).

Examples:

  • To enable anonymous login on all virtual hosts:

    auth_method: [anonymous]
    anonymous_protocol: login_anon
    
  • Similar as previous example, but limited to public.example.org:

    host_config:
      "public.example.org":
        auth_method: [anonymous]
        anonymous_protoco: login_anon
    
  • To enable anonymous login and internal authentication on a virtual host:

    host_config:
      "public.example.org":
        auth_method:
          - internal
          - anonymous
        anonymous_protocol: login_anon
    
  • To enable SASL Anonymous on a virtual host:

    host_config:
      "public.example.org":
        auth_method: [anonymous]
        anonymous_protocol: sasl_anon
    
  • To enable SASL Anonymous and anonymous login on a virtual host:

    host_config:
      "public.example.org":
        auth_method: [anonymous]
        anonymous_protocol: both
    
  • To enable SASL Anonymous, anonymous login, and internal authentication on a virtual host:

    host_config:
      "public.example.org":
        auth_method:
          - internal
          - anonymous
        anonymous_protocol: both
    

There are more configuration examples and XMPP client example stanzas in Anonymous users support.

PAM Authentication

ejabberd supports authentication via Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM). PAM is currently supported in AIX, FreeBSD, HP-UX, Linux, Mac OS X, NetBSD and Solaris. PAM authentication is disabled by default, so you have to configure and compile ejabberd with PAM support enabled:

./configure --enable-pam && make install

Options:

pam_service: Name: This option defines the PAM service name. Default is ejabberd. Refer to the PAM documentation of your operation system for more information.

pam_userinfotype: username|jid: This option defines what type of information about the user ejabberd provides to the PAM service: only the username, or the user JID. Default is username.

Example:

auth_method: [pam]
pam_service: "ejabberd"

Though it is quite easy to set up PAM support in ejabberd, PAM itself introduces some security issues:

  • To perform PAM authentication ejabberd uses external C-program called epam. By default, it is located in /var/lib/ejabberd/priv/bin/ directory. You have to set it root on execution in the case when your PAM module requires root privileges (pam_unix.so for example). Also you have to grant access for ejabberd to this file and remove all other permissions from it. Execute with root privileges:

    chown root:ejabberd /var/lib/ejabberd/priv/bin/epam
    chmod 4750 /var/lib/ejabberd/priv/bin/epam
    
  • Make sure you have the latest version of PAM installed on your system. Some old versions of PAM modules cause memory leaks. If you are not able to use the latest version, you can kill(1) epam process periodically to reduce its memory consumption: ejabberd will restart this process immediately.

  • epam program tries to turn off delays on authentication failures. However, some PAM modules ignore this behavior and rely on their own configuration options. You can create a configuration file ejabberd.pam. This example shows how to turn off delays in pam_unix.so module:

    #%PAM-1.0
    auth        sufficient  pam_unix.so likeauth nullok nodelay
    account     sufficient  pam_unix.so
    

    That is not a ready to use configuration file: you must use it as a hint when building your own PAM configuration instead. Note that if you want to disable delays on authentication failures in the PAM configuration file, you have to restrict access to this file, so a malicious user can’t use your configuration to perform brute-force attacks.

  • You may want to allow login access only for certain users. pam_listfile.so module provides such functionality.

  • If you use pam_winbind to authorise against a Windows Active Directory, then /etc/nsswitch.conf must be configured to use winbind as well.

Access Rules

This section describes new ACL syntax introduced in ejabberd 16.06. For old access rule and ACL syntax documentation, please refer to configuration document archive

ACL Definition

Access control in ejabberd is performed via Access Control Lists (ACLs). The declarations of ACLs in the configuration file have the following syntax:

acl: { ACLName: { ACLType: ACLValue } }

ACLType: ACLValue can be one of the following:

all: Matches all JIDs. Example:

    acl:
      world: all

user: Username: Matches the user with the name Username on any of the local virtual host. Example:

    acl:
      admin:
        user: "yozhik"

user: {Username: Server} | Jid: Matches the user with the JID Username@Server and any resource. Example:

    acl:
      admin:
        - user:
          "yozhik": "example.org"
        - user: "peter@example.org"

server: Server: Matches any JID from server Server. Example:

    acl:
      exampleorg:
        server: "example.org"

resource: Resource: Matches any JID with a resource Resource. Example:

    acl:
      mucklres:
        resource: "muckl"

shared_group: Groupname: Matches any member of a Shared Roster Group with name Groupname in the virtual host. Example:

    acl:
      techgroupmembers:
        shared_group: "techteam"

shared_group: {Groupname: Server}: Matches any member of a Shared Roster Group with name Groupname in the virtual host Server. Example:

    acl:
      techgroupmembers:
        shared_group:
          "techteam": "example.org"

ip: Network: Matches any IP address from the Network. Example:

    acl:
      loopback:
        ip:
          - "127.0.0.0/8"
          - "::1"

user_regexp: Regexp: Matches any local user with a name that matches Regexp on local virtual hosts. Example:

    acl:
      tests:
        user_regexp: "^test[0-9]*$"

user_regexp: {Regexp: Server} | JidRegexp: Matches any user with a name that matches Regexp at server Server. Example:

    acl:
      tests:
        user_regexp:
          - "^test1": "example.org"
          - "^test2@example.org"

server_regexp: Regexp: Matches any JID from the server that matches Regexp. Example:

    acl:
      icq:
        server_regexp: "^icq\\."

resource_regexp: Regexp: Matches any JID with a resource that matches Regexp. Example:

    acl:
      icq:
        resource_regexp: "^laptop\\."

node_regexp: {UserRegexp: ServerRegexp}: Matches any user with a name that matches UserRegexp at any server that matches ServerRegexp. Example:

    acl:
      yozhik:
        node_regexp:
          "^yozhik$": "^example.(com|org)$"

user_glob: Glob:

user_glob: {Glob: Server}:

server_glob: Glob:

resource_glob: Glob:

node_glob: {UserGlob: ServerGlob}: This is the same as above. However, it uses shell glob patterns instead of regexp. These patterns can have the following special characters:

  • *: matches any string including the null string.

  • ?: matches any single character.

  • [...]: matches any of the enclosed characters. Character ranges are specified by a pair of characters separated by a -. If the first character after [ is a !, any character not enclosed is matched.

The following ACLName are pre-defined:

all: Matches any JID.

none: Matches no JID.

Access Rights

An entry allowing or denying access to different services. The syntax is:

access_rules: { AccessName: { - allow|deny: ACLRule|ACLDefinition } }

Each definition may contain arbitrary number of - allow or - deny sections, and each section can contain any number of acl rules (as defined in previous section, it recognizes one additional rule acl: RuleName that matches when acl rule named RuleName matches). If no rule or definition is defined, the rule all is applyed.

Definition's - allow and - deny sections are processed in top to bottom order, and first one for which all listed acl rules matches is returned as result of access rule. If no rule matches deny is returned.

To simplify configuration two shortcut version are available: - allow: acl and - allow, example below shows equivalent definitions where short or long version are used:

access_rules:
  a_short: admin
  a_long:
    - acl: admin
  b_short:
    - deny: banned
    - allow
  b_long:
    - deny:
      - acl: banned
    - allow:
      - all

If you define specific Access rights in a virtual host, remember that the globally defined Access rights have precedence over those. This means that, in case of conflict, the Access granted or denied in the global server is used and the Access of a virtual host doesn’t have effect.

Example:

  access_rules:
    configure:
      - allow: admin
    something:
      - deny: someone
      - allow
    s2s_banned:
      - deny: problematic_hosts
      - deny:
        - acl: banned_forever
      - deny:
        - ip: "222.111.222.111/32"
      - deny:
        - ip: "111.222.111.222/32"
      - allow
    xmlrpc_access:
      - allow:
        - user: "peter@example.com"
      - allow:
        - user: "ivone@example.com"
      - allow:
        - user: "bot@example.com"
        - ip: "10.0.0.0/24"

The following AccessName are pre-defined:

all: Always returns the value ‘allow’.

none: Always returns the value ‘deny’.

Shaper Rules

An entry allowing to declaring shaper to use for matching user/hosts. The syntax is:

shaper_rules: { ShaperRuleName: { - Number|ShaperName: ACLRule|ACLDefinition } }

Semantic is similar to that described in Access Rights section, only difference is that instead using - allow or - deny, name of shaper or number should be used.

Examples:

shaper_rules:
  connections_limit:
    - 10:
      - user: "peter@example.com"
    - 100: admin
    - 5
  download_speed:
    - fast: admin
    - slow: anonymous_users
    - normal
  log_days: 30

Limiting Opened Sessions with ACL

The special access max_user_sessions specifies the maximum number of sessions (authenticated connections) per user. If a user tries to open more sessions by using different resources, the first opened session will be disconnected. The error session replaced will be sent to the disconnected session. The value for this option can be either a number, or infinity. The default value is infinity.

The syntax is:

{ max_user_sessions: { - Number: ACLRule|ACLDefinition } }

This example limits the number of sessions per user to 5 for all users, and to 10 for admins:

shaper_rules:
  max_user_sessions:
    - 10: admin
    - 5

Several connections to a remote XMPP server with ACL

The special access max_s2s_connections specifies how many simultaneous S2S connections can be established to a specific remote XMPP server. The default value is 1. There’s also available the access max_s2s_connections_per_node.

The syntax is:

{ max_s2s_connections: { ACLName: MaxNumber } }

Examples:

  • Allow up to 3 connections with each remote server:

    shaper_rules:
      max_s2s_connections: 3
    

Shapers

Shapers enable you to limit connection traffic. The syntax is:

shaper: { ShaperName: Rate }: where Rate stands for the maximum allowed incoming rate in bytes per second. When a connection exceeds this limit, ejabberd stops reading from the socket until the average rate is again below the allowed maximum.

Examples:

  • To define a shaper named ‘normal’ with traffic speed limited to 1,000bytes/second:

    shaper:
      normal: 1000
    
  • To define a shaper named ‘fast’ with traffic speed limited to 50,000bytes/second:

    shaper:
      fast: 50000
    

Default Language

The option language defines the default language of server strings that can be seen by XMPP clients. If a XMPP client does not support xml:lang, the specified language is used.

The option syntax is:

language: Language: The default value is en. In order to take effect there must be a translation file Language.msg in ejabberd’s msgs directory.

For example, to set Russian as default language:

language: "ru"

The page Internationalization and Localization provides more details.

CAPTCHA

Some ejabberd modules can be configured to require a CAPTCHA challenge on certain actions. If the client does not support CAPTCHA Forms (XEP-0158), a web link is provided so the user can fill the challenge in a web browser.

An example script is provided that generates the image using ImageMagick’s Convert program.

Note: we do not provide example scripts to support image generation on Microsoft Windows. Captcha will not work with ejabberd Windows installer.

The configurable options are:

captcha_cmd: Path: Full path to a script that generates the image. The default value disables the feature: undefined

captcha_host: ProtocolHostPort: ProtocolHostPort is a string with the host, and optionally the Protocol and Port number. It must identify where ejabberd listens for CAPTCHA requests. The URL sent to the user is formed by: Protocol://Host:Port/captcha/ The default value is: protocol http, the first hostname configured, and port 80. If you specify a port number that does not match exactly an ejabberd listener (because you are using a reverse proxy or other port-forwarding tool), then you must specify the transfer protocol, as seen in the example below.

Additionally, an ejabberd_http listener must be enabled with the captcha option. See section Listening Module.

Example configuration:

hosts: ["example.org"]

captcha_cmd: "/lib/ejabberd/priv/bin/captcha.sh"
captcha_host: "example.org:5280"
## captcha_host: "https://example.org:443"
## captcha_host: "http://example.com"

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5280
    module: ejabberd_http
    captcha: true
  ...

Node settings

net_ticktime: 60

: This option can be used to tune tick time parameter of net_kernel. It tells erlang VM how often nodes should check if intra-node communication was not interruped. This option must have identical value on all nodes, or it will lead to subtle bugs. Usually leaving default value of this is option is best, tweak it only if you know what are you doing.

STUN and TURN

ejabberd is able to act as a stand-alone STUN/TURN server (RFC 5389/RFC 5766). In that role ejabberd helps clients with ICE (RFC 5245) or Jingle ICE (XEP-0176) support to discover their external addresses and ports and to relay media traffic when it is impossible to establish direct peer-to-peer connection.

You should configure ejabberd_stun listening module as described in Listening Module section. The specific configurable options are:

tls: true|false: If enabled, certfile option must be set, otherwise ejabberd will not be able to accept TLS connections. Obviously, this option makes sense for tcp transport only. The default is false.

certfile: Path: Path to the certificate file. Only makes sense when tls is set.

use_turn: true|false: Enables/disables TURN (media relay) functionality. The default is false.

turn_ip: String: The IPv4 address advertised by your TURN server. The address should not be NAT’ed or firewalled. There is not default, so you should set this option explicitly. Implies use_turn.

turn_min_port: Integer: Together with turn_max_port forms port range to allocate from. The default is 49152. Implies use_turn.

turn_max_port: Integer: Together with turn_min_port forms port range to allocate from. The default is 65535. Implies use_turn.

turn_max_allocations: Integer|infinity: Maximum number of TURN allocations available from the particular IP address. The default value is 10. Implies use_turn.

turn_max_permissions: Integer|infinity: Maximum number of TURN permissions available from the particular IP address. The default value is 10. Implies use_turn.

auth_type: user|anonymous: Which authentication type to use for TURN allocation requests. When type user is set, ejabberd authentication backend is used. For anonymous type no authentication is performed (not recommended for public services). The default is user. Implies use_turn.

auth_realm: String: When auth_type is set to user and you have several virtual hosts configured you should set this option explicitly to the virtual host you want to serve on this particular listening port. Implies use_turn.

shaper: Atom: For tcp transports defines shaper to use. The default is none.

server_name: String: Defines software version to return with every response. The default is the STUN library version.

Example configuration with disabled TURN functionality (STUN only):

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 3478
    transport: udp
    module: ejabberd_stun
  -
    port: 3478
    module: ejabberd_stun
  -
    port: 5349
    module: ejabberd_stun
    certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/server.pem"
  ...

Example configuration with TURN functionality. Note that STUN is always enabled if TURN is enabled. Here, only UDP section is shown:

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 3478
    transport: udp
    use_turn: true
    turn_ip: "10.20.30.1"
    module: ejabberd_stun
  ...

You also need to configure DNS SRV records properly so clients can easily discover a STUN/TURN server serving your XMPP domain. Refer to section DNS Discovery of a Server of RFC 5389 and section Creating an Allocation of RFC 5766 for details.

Example DNS SRV configuration for STUN only:

_stun._udp   IN SRV  0 0 3478 stun.example.com.
_stun._tcp   IN SRV  0 0 3478 stun.example.com.
_stuns._tcp  IN SRV  0 0 5349 stun.example.com.

And you should also add these in the case if TURN is enabled:

_turn._udp   IN SRV  0 0 3478 turn.example.com.
_turn._tcp   IN SRV  0 0 3478 turn.example.com.
_turns._tcp  IN SRV  0 0 5349 turn.example.com.

SIP

SIP Configuration

ejabberd has built-in SIP support. In order to activate it you need to add listeners for it, configure DNS properly and enable mod_sip for the desired virtual host.

To add a listener you should configure ejabberd_sip listening module as described in Listening Module section. If option tls is specified, option certfile must be specified as well, otherwise incoming TLS connections would fail.

Example configuration with standard ports (as per RFC 3261):

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5060
    transport: udp
    module: ejabberd_sip
  -
    port: 5060
    module: ejabberd_sip
  -
    port: 5061
    module: ejabberd_sip
    tls: true
    certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/server.pem"
  ...

Note that there is no StartTLS support in SIP and SNI support is somewhat tricky, so for TLS you have to configure different virtual hosts on different ports if you have different certificate files for them.

Next you need to configure DNS SIP records for your virtual domains. Refer to RFC 3263 for the detailed explanation. Simply put, you should add NAPTR and SRV records for your domains. Skip NAPTR configuration if your DNS provider doesn’t support this type of records. It’s not fatal, however, highly recommended.

Example configuration of NAPTR records:

example.com IN NAPTR 10  0 "s" "SIPS+D2T" "" _sips._tcp.example.com.
example.com IN NAPTR 20  0 "s" "SIP+D2T" "" _sip._tcp.example.com.
example.com IN NAPTR 30  0 "s" "SIP+D2U" "" _sip._udp.example.com.

Example configuration of SRV records with standard ports (as per RFC 3261):

_sip._udp   IN SRV  0 0 5060 sip.example.com.
_sip._tcp   IN SRV  0 0 5060 sip.example.com.
_sips._tcp  IN SRV  0 0 5061 sip.example.com.

Note on SIP usage

SIP authentication does not support SCRAM. As such, it is not possible to use mod_sip to authenticate when ejabberd has been set to encrypt password with SCRAM.

Include Additional Configuration Files

The option include_config_file in a configuration file instructs ejabberd to include other configuration files immediately.

The basic syntax is:

include_config_file: [Filename]

It is possible to specify suboptions using the full syntax:

include_config_file: { Filename: [Suboption, ...] }: The filename can be indicated either as an absolute path, or relative to the main ejabberd configuration file. It isn’t possible to use wildcards. The file must exist and be readable.

The allowed suboptions are:

disallow: [Optionname, ...]: Disallows the usage of those options in the included configuration file. The options that match this criteria are not accepted. The default value is an empty list: []

allow_only: [Optionname, ...]: Allows only the usage of those options in the included configuration file. The options that do not match this criteria are not accepted. The default value is: all

This is a basic example:

include_config_file: "/etc/ejabberd/additional.yml"

In this example, the included file is not allowed to contain a listen option. If such an option is present, the option will not be accepted. The file is in a subdirectory from where the main configuration file is.

include_config_file:
  "./example.org/additional_not_listen.yml":
    disallow: [listen]

In this example, ejabberd.yml defines some ACL and Access rules, and later includes another file with additional rules:

acl:
  admin:
    user:
      - "admin": "localhost"
access_rules:
  announce:
    - allow: admin
include_config_file:
  "/etc/ejabberd/acl_and_access.yml":
    allow_only:
      - acl
      - access_rules

and content of the file acl_and_access.yml can be, for example:

acl:
  admin:
    user:
      - "bob": "localhost"
      - "jan": "localhost"

Option Macros in Configuration File

In the ejabberd configuration file, it is possible to define a macro for a value and later use this macro when defining an option.

A macro is defined with this syntax:

define_macro: { ’MACRO’: Value }: The MACRO must be surrounded by single quotation marks, and all letters in uppercase; check the examples bellow. The value can be any valid arbitrary Erlang term.

The first definition of a macro is preserved, and additional definitions of the same macro are forgotten.

Macros are processed after additional configuration files have been included, so it is possible to use macros that are defined in configuration files included before the usage.

It isn’t possible to use a macro in the definition of another macro.

This example shows the basic usage of a macro:

define_macro:
  'LOG_LEVEL_NUMBER': 5
loglevel: 'LOG_LEVEL_NUMBER'

The resulting option interpreted by ejabberd is: loglevel: 5.

This example shows that values can be any arbitrary Erlang term:

define_macro:
  'USERBOB':
    user:
      - "bob": "localhost"
acl:
  admin: 'USERBOB'

The resulting option interpreted by ejabberd is:

acl:
  admin:
    user:
      - "bob": "localhost"

This complex example:

define_macro:
  'NUMBER_PORT_C2S': 5222
  'NUMBER_PORT_HTTP': 5280
listen:
  -
    port: 'NUMBER_PORT_C2S'
    module: ejabberd_c2s
  -
    port: 'NUMBER_PORT_HTTP'
    module: ejabberd_http

produces this result after being interpreted:

listen:
  -
    port: 5222
    module: ejabberd_c2s
  -
    port: 5280
    module: ejabberd_http

Database and LDAP Configuration

ejabberd uses its internal Mnesia database by default. However, it is possible to use a relational database, key-value storage or an LDAP server to store persistent, long-living data. ejabberd is very flexible: you can configure different authentication methods for different virtual hosts, you can configure different authentication mechanisms for the same virtual host (fallback), you can set different storage systems for modules, and so forth.

The following databases are supported by ejabberd:

The following LDAP servers are tested with ejabberd:

Important note about virtual hosting: if you define several domains in ejabberd.yml (see section Host Names), you probably want that each virtual host uses a different configuration of database, authentication and storage, so that usernames do not conflict and mix between different virtual hosts. For that purpose, the options described in the next sections must be set inside a host_config for each vhost (see section Virtual Hosting). For example:

host_config:
  "public.example.org":
    sql_type: pgsql
    sql_server: "localhost"
    sql_database: "database-public-example-org"
    sql_username: "ejabberd"
    sql_password: "password"
    auth_method: [sql]

Relational Databases

You need to upload SQL schema to your SQL server. Choose the one from this list.

The actual database access is defined in the options with sql_ prefix. The values are used to define if we want to use ODBC, or one of the two native interface available, PostgreSQL or MySQL.

The following paramaters are available:

sql_type: mysql | pgsql | odbc | mssql | sqlite: The type of an SQL connection. The default is odbc.

sql_server: String: A hostname of the SQL server. The default is localhost.

sql_port: Port: The port where the SQL server is accepting connections. The option is valid for mysql, pgsql and mssql. The default is 3306 and 5432 respectively.

sql_database: String: The database name. The default is ejabberd. The option is valid for mysql, pgsql and mssql.

sql_username: String: The username. The default is ejabberd. The option is valid for mysql, pgsql and mssql.

sql_password: String: The password. The default is empty string. The option is valid for mysql, pgsql and mssql.

sql_pool_size: N: By default ejabberd opens 10 connections to the database for each virtual host. You can change this number by using this option.

sql_keepalive_interval: N: You can configure an interval to make a dummy SQL request to keep alive the connections to the database. The default value is ’undefined’, so no keepalive requests are made. Specify in seconds: for example 28800 means 8 hours.

sql_start_interval: N: If the connection to the database fails, ejabberd waits 30 seconds before retrying. You can modify this interval with this option.

Example of plain ODBC connection:

sql_server: "DSN=database;UID=ejabberd;PWD=password"

Example of MySQL connection:

sql_type: mysql
sql_server: "server.company.com"
sql_port: 3306 # the default
sql_database: "mydb"
sql_username: "user1"
sql_password: "**********"
sql_pool_size: 5

Microsoft SQL Notes

For now, MS SQL is only supported in Unix-like OS'es. You need to have FreeTDS and unixODBC installed on your machine. Also, in some cases you need to add machine name to sql_username, especially when you have sql_server defined as an IP address, e.g.:

sql_type: mssql
sql_server: "1.2.3.4"
...
sql_username: "user1@host"

SQL Authentication

You can authenticate users against an SQL database, see the option auth_method in section Authentication.

The option auth_password_format is supported, for details see section Internal. Please note that if you use SQL auth method and set SCRAM format, old plain passwords tha may be stored in the database are not automatically scrammed. For that, you can execute the command:

ejabberdctl convert_to_scram example.org

SQL Storage

An ODBC compatible database also can be used to store information into from several ejabberd modules. See section Modules Overview to see which modules can be used with relational databases like MySQL. To enable storage to your database, just make sure that your database is running well (see previous sections), and add the module option db_type: sql or set default_db: sql globally if you want to use SQL for all modules.

LDAP

ejabberd has built-in LDAP support. You can authenticate users against LDAP server and use LDAP directory as vCard storage.

Usually ejabberd treats LDAP as a read-only storage: it is possible to consult data, but not possible to create accounts or edit vCard that is stored in LDAP. However, it is possible to change passwords if mod_register module is enabled and LDAP server supports RFC 3062.

LDAP Connection

Two connections are established to the LDAP server per vhost, one for authentication and other for regular calls.

Parameters:

ldap_servers: [Servers, ...]: List of IP addresses or DNS names of your LDAP servers. This option is required.

ldap_encrypt: none|tls: Type of connection encryption to the LDAP server. Allowed values are: none, tls. The value tls enables encryption by using LDAP over SSL. Note that STARTTLS encryption is not supported. The default value is: none.

ldap_tls_verify: false|soft|hard: This option specifies whether to verify LDAP server certificate or not when TLS is enabled. When hard is enabled ejabberd doesn’t proceed if a certificate is invalid. When soft is enabled ejabberd proceeds even if check fails. The default is false which means no checks are performed.

ldap_tls_cacertfile: Path: Path to file containing PEM encoded CA certificates. This option is needed (and required) when TLS verification is enabled.

ldap_tls_depth: Number: Specifies the maximum verification depth when TLS verification is enabled, i.e. how far in a chain of certificates the verification process can proceed before the verification is considered to fail. Peer certificate = 0, CA certificate = 1, higher level CA certificate = 2, etc. The value 2 thus means that a chain can at most contain peer cert, CA cert, next CA cert, and an additional CA cert. The default value is 1.

ldap_port: Number: Port to connect to your LDAP server. The default port is 389 if encryption is disabled; and 636 if encryption is enabled. If you configure a value, it is stored in ejabberd’s database. Then, if you remove that value from the configuration file, the value previously stored in the database will be used instead of the default port.

ldap_rootdn: RootDN: Bind DN. The default value is empty string "" which means ‘anonymous connection’.

ldap_password: Password: Bind password. The default value is is empty string.

ldap_deref_aliases: never|always|finding|searching: Whether or not to dereference aliases. The default is never.

Example:

auth_method: [ldap]
ldap_servers:
  - "ldap1.example.org"
ldap_port: 389
ldap_rootdn: "cn=Manager,dc=domain,dc=org"
ldap_password: "**********"

LDAP Authentication

You can authenticate users against an LDAP directory. Note that current LDAP implementation does not support SASL authentication.

Available options are:

ldap_base: Base: LDAP base directory which stores users accounts. This option is required.

ldap_uids: [ ldap_uidattr | {ldap_uidattr: ldap_uidattr_format} ]: LDAP attribute which holds a list of attributes to use as alternatives for getting the JID. The default attributes are [{uid, %u}]. The attributes are of the form: [{ldap_uidattr}] or [{ldap_uidattr, ldap_uidattr_format}]. You can use as many comma separated attributes as needed. The values for ldap_uidattr and ldap_uidattr_format are described as follow:

  • ldap_uidattr: LDAP attribute which holds the user’s part of a JID. The default value is uid.

  • ldap_uidattr_format: Format of the ldap_uidattr variable. The format must contain one and only one pattern variable %u which will be replaced by the user’s part of a JID. For example, %u@example.org. The default value is %u.

ldap_filter: Filter: RFC 4515 LDAP filter. The default Filter value is: undefined. Example: (&(objectClass=shadowAccount)(memberOf=Jabber Users)). Please, do not forget to close brackets and do not use superfluous whitespaces. Also you must not use ldap_uidattr attribute in filter because this attribute will be substituted in LDAP filter automatically.

ldap_dn_filter: { Filter: FilterAttrs }: This filter is applied on the results returned by the main filter. This filter performs additional LDAP lookup to make the complete result. This is useful when you are unable to define all filter rules in ldap_filter. You can define %u, %d, %s and %D pattern variables in Filter: %u is replaced by a user’s part of a JID, %d is replaced by the corresponding domain (virtual host), all %s variables are consecutively replaced by values of FilterAttrs attributes and %D is replaced by Distinguished Name. By default ldap_dn_filter is undefined. Example:

    ldap_dn_filter:
      "(&(name=%s)(owner=%D)(user=%u@%d))": ["sn"]

Since this filter makes additional LDAP lookups, use it only in the
last resort: try to define all filter rules in `ldap_filter` if
possible.

{ldap_local_filter, Filter}: If you can’t use ldap_filter due to performance reasons (the LDAP server has many users registered), you can use this local filter. The local filter checks an attribute in ejabberd, not in LDAP, so this limits the load on the LDAP directory. The default filter is: undefined. Example values:

    {ldap_local_filter, {notequal, {"accountStatus",["disabled"]}}}.
    {ldap_local_filter, {equal, {"accountStatus",["enabled"]}}}.
    {ldap_local_filter, undefined}.

LDAP Examples

Common example

Let’s say ldap.example.org is the name of our LDAP server. We have users with their passwords in ou=Users,dc=example,dc=org directory. Also we have addressbook, which contains users emails and their additional infos in ou=AddressBook,dc=example,dc=org directory. The connection to the LDAP server is encrypted using TLS, and using the custom port 6123. Corresponding authentication section should looks like this:

## Authentication method
auth_method: [ldap]
## DNS name of our LDAP server
ldap_servers: ["ldap.example.org"]
## Bind to LDAP server as "cn=Manager,dc=example,dc=org" with password "secret"
ldap_rootdn: "cn=Manager,dc=example,dc=org"
ldap_password: "secret"
ldap_encrypt: tls
ldap_port: 6123
## Define the user's base
ldap_base: "ou=Users,dc=example,dc=org"
## We want to authorize users from 'shadowAccount' object class only
ldap_filter: "(objectClass=shadowAccount)"

Now we want to use users LDAP-info as their vCards. We have four attributes defined in our LDAP schema: mail — email address, givenName — first name, sn — second name, birthDay — birthday. Also we want users to search each other. Let’s see how we can set it up:

modules:
  ...
  mod_vcard_ldap:
    ## We use the same server and port, but want to bind anonymously because
    ## our LDAP server accepts anonymous requests to
    ## "ou=AddressBook,dc=example,dc=org" subtree.
    ldap_rootdn: ""
    ldap_password: ""
    ## define the addressbook's base
    ldap_base: "ou=AddressBook,dc=example,dc=org"
    ## uidattr: user's part of JID is located in the "mail" attribute
    ## uidattr_format: common format for our emails
    ldap_uids:
      "mail": "%u@mail.example.org"
    ## We have to define empty filter here, because entries in addressbook does not
    ## belong to shadowAccount object class
    ldap_filter: ""
    ## Now we want to define vCard pattern
    ldap_vcard_map:
     "NICKNAME": {"%u": []} # just use user's part of JID as his nickname
     "GIVEN": {"%s": ["givenName"]}
     "FAMILY": {"%s": ["sn"]}
     "FN": {"%s, %s": ["sn", "givenName"]} # example: "Smith, John"
     "EMAIL": {"%s": ["mail"]}
     "BDAY": {"%s": ["birthDay"]}]}
    ## Search form
    ldap_search_fields:
      "User": "%u"
      "Name": "givenName"
      "Family Name": "sn"
      "Email": "mail"
      "Birthday": "birthDay"
    ## vCard fields to be reported
    ## Note that JID is always returned with search results
    ldap_search_reported:
      "Full Name": "FN"
      "Nickname": "NICKNAME"
      "Birthday": "BDAY"
  ...

Note that mod_vcard_ldap module checks for the existence of the user before searching in his information in LDAP.

Active Directory

Active Directory is just an LDAP-server with predefined attributes. A sample configuration is shown below:

auth_method: [ldap]
ldap_servers: ["office.org"]  # List of LDAP servers
ldap_base: "DC=office,DC=org" # Search base of LDAP directory
ldap_rootdn: "CN=Administrator,CN=Users,DC=office,DC=org" # LDAP manager
ldap_password: "*******" # Password to LDAP manager
ldap_uids: ["sAMAccountName"]
ldap_filter: "(memberOf=*)"

modules:
  ...
  mod_vcard_ldap:
    ldap_vcard_map:
      "NICKNAME": {"%u": []}
      "GIVEN": {"%s": ["givenName"]}
      "MIDDLE": {"%s": ["initials"]}
      "FAMILY": {"%s": ["sn"]}
      "FN": {"%s": ["displayName"]}
      "EMAIL": {"%s": ["mail"]}
      "ORGNAME": {"%s": ["company"]}
      "ORGUNIT": {"%s": ["department"]}
      "CTRY": {"%s": ["c"]}
      "LOCALITY": {"%s": ["l"]}
      "STREET": {"%s": ["streetAddress"]}
      "REGION": {"%s": ["st"]}
      "PCODE": {"%s": ["postalCode"]}
      "TITLE": {"%s": ["title"]}
      "URL": {"%s": ["wWWHomePage"]}
      "DESC": {"%s": ["description"]}
      "TEL": {"%s": ["telephoneNumber"]}]}
    ldap_search_fields:
      "User": "%u"
      "Name": "givenName"
      "Family Name": "sn"
      "Email": "mail"
      "Company": "company"
      "Department": "department"
      "Role": "title"
      "Description": "description"
      "Phone": "telephoneNumber"
    ldap_search_reported:
      "Full Name": "FN"
      "Nickname": "NICKNAME"
      "Email": "EMAIL"
  ...

Riak

Riak is a distributed NoSQL key-value data store. The actual database access is defined in the options with riak_ prefix.

Riak Connection

The following paramaters are available:

riak_server: String: A hostname of the Riak server. The default is localhost.

riak_port: Port: The port where the Riak server is accepting connections for Protocol Buffer (PBC). The default is 8087.

riak_pool_size: N: By default ejabberd opens 10 connections to the Riak server. You can change this number by using this option.

riak_start_interval: N: If the connection to the Riak server fails, ejabberd waits 30 seconds before retrying. You can modify this interval with this option.

Example configuration:

riak_server: "riak.server.com"
riak_port: 9097

Starting from ejabberd 16.03, Riak security and authentication is supported. It can be configured with the following additional parameters:

riak_cacertfile: String: Path to Riak ca.pem (i.e. "/path/to/ca.pem")

riak_username: String: Username to use to authenticate on Riak database.

riak_password: String: Password to use to authenticate on Riak database.

Riak Storage

Several ejabberd modules can be used to store information in Riak database. Refer to the corresponding module documentation to see if it supports such ability. To enable storage to Riak database, just make sure that your database is running well (see the next section), and add the module option db_type: riak or set default_db: riak globally if you want to use Riak for all modules.

Riak Configuration

First, you need to configure Riak to use LevelDB as a database backend.

If you are using Riak 2.x and higher, configure storage_backend option of /etc/riak/riak.conf as follows:

...
storage_backend = leveldb
...

If you are using Riak 1.4.x and older, configure storage_backend option of /etc/riak/app.config in the section riak_kv as follows:

...
 {riak_kv, [
            ...
            {storage_backend, riak_kv_eleveldb_backend},
...

Second, Riak should be pointed to ejabberd Erlang binary files (*.beam). As described in Install, by default those are located in /lib/ejabberd/ebin directory. So you should add the following to /etc/riak/vm.args:

...
## Path to ejabberd beams in order to make map/reduce
-pz /lib/ejabberd/ebin
...

Important notice: make sure Riak has at least read access to that directory. Otherwise its startup will likely fail.

Starting from version 16.03, Riak authentication is supported. You can enable it with Riak admin command:

riak-admin security enable

Redis

Redis is an advanced key-value cache and store. You can use it to store transient data, such as records for C2S (client) sessions. There are several options available:

redis_server: String: A hostname of the Redis server. The default is localhost.

redis_port: Port: The port where the Redis server is accepting connections. The default is 6379.

redis_password: String: The password to the Redis server. The default is an empty string, i.e. no password.

redis_db: N: Redis database number. The default is 0.

redis_reconnect_timeout: N: A number of seconds to wait before next connection attempt to the Redis server. The default is 1 second.

redis_connect_timeout: N: A number of seconds to wait for the connection to be established to the Redis server. The default is 1 second.

Example configuration:

redis_server: "redis.server.com"
redis_db: 1

Default database configuration

You can simplify the configuration by setting the default database. This can be done with default_db option:

default_db: mnesia|sql|riak: This will define the default database for a module lacking db_type option or if auth_method option is not set.

Session Management

By default pointers to C2S sessions are kept in Mnesia. You may want to use another database backend for this. The option is:

sm_db_type: mnesia|sql|redis: Note that for sql or redis you should have them configured. See sections Relational Databases or Redis.

Modules Configuration

The option modules defines the list of modules that will be loaded after ejabberd’s startup. Each entry in the list is a tuple in which the first element is the name of a module and the second is a list of options for that module.

The syntax is:

modules: { ModuleName: ModuleOptions }

Examples:

  • In this example only the module mod_echo is loaded and no module options are specified between the square brackets:

    modules:
      mod_echo: {}
    
  • In the second example the modules mod_echo, mod_time, and mod_version are loaded without options.

    modules:
      mod_echo:      {}
      mod_time:      {}
      mod_version:   {}
    

Modules Overview

The following table lists all modules included in ejabberd.

Module Feature Dependencies
mod_adhoc Ad-Hoc Commands (XEP-0050)
mod_announce Manage announcements recommends mod_adhoc
mod_blocking Simple Communications Blocking (XEP-0191) mod_privacy
mod_caps Entity Capabilities (XEP-0115)
mod_carboncopy Message Carbons (XEP-0280)
mod_client_state Filter stanzas for inactive clients
mod_configure Server configuration using Ad-Hoc mod_adhoc
mod_delegation Namespace Delegation (XEP-0355)
mod_disco Service Discovery (XEP-0030)
mod_echo Echoes XMPP stanzas
mod_fail2ban Bans IPs that show the malicious signs
mod_http_bind XMPP over Bosh service (HTTP Binding)
mod_http_fileserver Small HTTP file server
mod_http_upload HTTP File Upload (XEP-0363)
mod_http_upload_quota HTTP File Upload Quotas mod_http_upload
mod_irc IRC transport
mod_last Last Activity (XEP-0012)
mod_mam Message Archive Management (XEP-0313) mod_mam
mod_mix Mediated Information eXchange (XEP-0369) mod_pubsub
mod_metrics Simple metrics handler for runtime statistics
mod_muc Multi-User Chat (XEP-0045)
mod_muc_admin Administrative commands for Multi-User Chat mod_muc
mod_muc_log Multi-User Chat room logging mod_muc
mod_multicast Extended Stanza Addressing (XEP-0033)
mod_offline Offline message storage (XEP-0160)
mod_ping XMPP Ping and periodic keepalives (XEP-0199)
mod_pres_counter Detect presence subscription flood
mod_privacy Blocking Communication (XEP-0016)
mod_private Private XML Storage (XEP-0049)
mod_privilege Privileged Entity (XEP-0356)
mod_proxy65 SOCKS5 Bytestreams (XEP-0065)
mod_pubsub Pub-Sub (XEP-0060), PEP (XEP-0163) mod_caps
mod_register In-Band Registration (XEP-0077)
mod_register_web Web for Account Registrations
mod_roster Roster management (XMPP IM)
mod_service_log Copy user messages to logger service
mod_shared_roster Shared roster management mod_roster
mod_shared_roster_ldap LDAP Shared roster management mod_roster
mod_sic Server IP Check (XEP-0279)
mod_sip SIP Registrar/Proxy (RFC 3261) ejabberd_sip
mod_stats Statistics Gathering (XEP-0039)
mod_time Entity Time (XEP-0202)
mod_vcard vcard-temp (XEP-0054)
mod_vcard_ldap vcard-temp (XEP-0054) LDAP server
mod_vcard_xupdate vCard-Based Avatars (XEP-0153) mod_vcard
mod_version Software Version (XEP-0092)

You can see which database backend each module needs by looking at the suffix:

  • No suffix, this means that the module uses Erlang’s built-in database Mnesia as backend, Riak key-value store or SQL database (see Database and LDAP Configuration).

  • ‘_ldap’, this means that the module needs an LDAP server as backend.

You can find more contributed modules on the ejabberd website. Please remember that these contributions might not work or that they can contain severe bugs and security leaks. Therefore, use them at your own risk!

Common Options

The following options are used by many modules. Therefore, they are described in this separate section.

iqdisc

Many modules define handlers for processing IQ queries of different namespaces to this server or to a user (e.g. to example.org or to user@example.org). This option defines processing discipline for these queries.

The syntax is:

iqdisc: Value: Possible Value are:

  • no_queue: All queries of a namespace with this processing discipline are processed directly. This means that the XMPP connection that sends this IQ query gets blocked: no other packets can be processed until this one has been completely processed. Hence this discipline is not recommended if the processing of a query can take a relatively long time.

  • one_queue: In this case a separate queue is created for the processing of IQ queries of a namespace with this discipline. In addition, the processing of this queue is done in parallel with that of other packets. This discipline is most recommended.

  • N: N separate queues are created to process the queries. The queries are thus processed in parallel, but in a controlled way.

  • parallel: For every packet with this discipline a separate Erlang process is spawned. Consequently, all these packets are processed in parallel. Although spawning of Erlang process has a relatively low cost, this can break the server’s normal work, because the Erlang emulator has a limit on the number of processes (32000 by default).

Example:

modules:
  ...
  mod_time:
    iqdisc: no_queue
  ...

host

This option defines the Jabber ID of a service provided by an ejabberd module.

The syntax is:

host: HostName:

If you include the keyword “@HOST@” in the HostName, it is replaced at start time with the real virtual host string.

This example configures the echo module to provide its echoing service in the Jabber ID mirror.example.org:

modules:
  ...
  mod_echo:
    host: "mirror.example.org"
  ...

However, if there are several virtual hosts and this module is enabled in all of them, the “@HOST@” keyword must be used:

modules:
  ...
  mod_echo:
    host: "mirror.@HOST@"
  ...

mod_admin_extra

Available option:

module_resource: Resource: Indicate the resource that the XMPP stanzas must use in the FROM or TO JIDs. This is only useful in the vcard set and get commands. The default value is "mod_admin_extra".

In this example configuration, the users vcards can only be modified by executing mod_admin_extra commands:

acl:
  adminextraresource:
    - resource: "modadminextraf8x,31ad"
access_rules:
  vcard_set:
    - allow: adminextraresource
modules:
  mod_admin_extra:
module_resource: "modadminextraf8x,31ad"
  mod_vcard:
access_set: vcard_set

Description of some commands:

pushroster: The file used by pushroster and pushroster-all must be placed: - Windows: on the directory were you installed ejabberd: C:/Program Files/ejabberd - Other OS: on the same directory where the .beam files are. Example content for the roster file:

    [{<<"bob">>, <<"example.org">>, <<"workers">>, <<"Bob">>},
     {<<"mart">>, <<"example.org">>, <<"workers">>, <<"Mart">>},
     {<<"Rich">>, <<"example.org">>, <<"bosses">>, <<"Rich">>}].

srg-create: If you want to put a group Name with blankspaces, use the characters "' and '" to define when the Name starts and ends. For example:

    ejabberdctl srg-create g1 example.org "'Group number 1'" this_is_g1 g1

ban-account: This command kicks all the connected sessions of the account from the server. It also changes his password to another randomly generated, so he can't login anymore unless a server administrator changes him again the password.

It is possible to define the reason of the ban. The new password also includes the reason and the date and time of the ban.

For example, if this command is called:

    ejabberdctl vhost example.org ban-account boby Spammed several MUC rooms

then the sessions of the local account which JID is boby@example.org will be kicked, and its password will be set to something like this:

    BANNED_ACCOUNT--20080425T21:45:07--2176635--Spammed_several_MUC_rooms

mod_announce

This module enables configured users to broadcast announcements and to set the message of the day (MOTD). Configured users can perform these actions with a XMPP client either using Ad-hoc commands or sending messages to specific JIDs.

The Ad-hoc commands are listed in the Server Discovery. For this feature to work, mod_adhoc must be enabled.

The specific JIDs where messages can be sent are listed bellow. The first JID in each entry will apply only to the specified virtual host example.org, while the JID between brackets will apply to all virtual hosts in ejabberd.

example.org/announce/all (example.org/announce/all-hosts/all): The message is sent to all registered users. If the user is online and connected to several resources, only the resource with the highest priority will receive the message. If the registered user is not connected, the message will be stored offline in assumption that offline storage (see section  mod_offline) is enabled.

example.org/announce/online (example.org/announce/all-hosts/online): The message is sent to all connected users. If the user is online and connected to several resources, all resources will receive the message.

example.org/announce/motd (example.org/announce/all-hosts/motd): The message is set as the message of the day (MOTD) and is sent to users when they login. In addition the message is sent to all connected users (similar to announce/online).

example.org/announce/motd/update (example.org/announce/all-hosts/motd/update): The message is set as message of the day (MOTD) and is sent to users when they login. The message is not sent to any currently connected user.

example.org/announce/motd/delete (example.org/announce/all-hosts/motd/delete): Any message sent to this JID removes the existing message of the day (MOTD).

Options:

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

access: AccessName: This option specifies who is allowed to send announcements and to set the message of the day (by default, nobody is able to send such messages).

Examples:

  • Only administrators can send announcements:

    access_rules:
      announce:
        - allow: admin
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_adhoc: {}
      mod_announce:
        access: announce
      ...
    
  • Administrators as well as the direction can send announcements:

    acl:
      direction:
        user:
          "big_boss": "example.org"
          "assistant": "example.org"
      admin:
        user:
          "admin": "example.org"
    access_rules:
      announce:
        - allow: admin
        - allow: direction
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_adhoc: {}
      mod_announce:
        access: announce
      ...
    

Note that mod_announce can be resource intensive on large deployments as it can broadcast lot of messages. This module should be disabled for instances of ejabberd with hundreds of thousands users.

mod_client_state

This module allows for queueing certain types of stanzas when a client indicates that the user is not actively using the client right now (see XEP-0352). This can save bandwidth and resources.

A stanza is dropped from the queue if it's effectively obsoleted by a new one (e.g., a new presence stanza would replace an old one from the same client). The queue is flushed if a stanza arrives that won't be queued, or if the queue size reaches a certain limit (currently 100 stanzas), or if the client becomes active again.

Options:

queue_chat_states: true|false: Queue “standalone” chat state notifications (as defined in XEP-0085) while a client indicates inactivity. The default value is true.

queue_pep: true|false: Queue PEP notifications while a client is inactive. When the queue is flushed, only the most recent notification of a given PEP node is delivered. The default value is true.

queue_presence: true|false: While a client is inactive, queue presence stanzas that indicate (un)availability. The default value is true.

Example:

modules:
  ...
  mod_client_state:
    queue_chat_states: true
    queue_pep: false
    queue_presence: true
  ...

mod_delegation

This module is an implementation of (XEP-0355). Only admin mode has been implemented by now. Namespace delegation allows external services to handle IQ using specific namespace. This may be applied for external PEP service.

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Namespace Delegation (urn:xmpp:delegation) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

Example:

To use the module add mod_delegation to modules section:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_delegation: {}
      ...

If you want to delegate namespaces to a component, specify them in the component configurations, e.g.:

    listen:
      ...
      -
        port: 8888
        module: ejabberd_service
        hosts:
          "sat-pubsub.example.org":
            password: "secret"
        delegations:
          "urn:xmpp:mam:1":
            filtering: ["node"]
          "http://jabber.org/protocol/pubsub":
            filtering: []
      ...

In the example above sat-pubsub.example.org will receive all pubsub requests and all MAM requests with the node filtering attribute presented in <query/>.

Make sure you do not delegate the same namespace to several services at the same time. As in the example above to have the sat-pubsub.example.org component perform correctly disable the mod_pubsub module.

Security issue

Namespace delegation gives components access to sensitive data, so permission should be granted carefully, only if you trust the component.

Note

This module is complementary to mod_privilege (XEP-0356) but can also be used separately.

mod_disco

This module adds support for Service Discovery (XEP-0030). With this module enabled, services on your server can be discovered by XMPP clients. Note that ejabberd has no modules with support for the superseded Jabber Browsing (XEP-0011) and Agent Information (XEP-0094). Accordingly, XMPP clients need to have support for the newer Service Discovery protocol if you want them be able to discover the services you offer.

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Service Discovery (http://jabber.org/protocol/disco#items and http://jabber.org/protocol/disco#info) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

extra_domains: [Domain, ...]: With this option, you can specify a list of extra domains that are added to the Service Discovery item list.

server_info: [ { modules: Modules, name: Name, urls: [URL, ...] } ]: Specify additional information about the server, as described in Contact Addresses for XMPP Services (XEP-0157). Modules can be the keyword ‘all’, in which case the information is reported in all the services; or a list of ejabberd modules, in which case the information is only specified for the services provided by those modules. Any arbitrary Name and URL can be specified, not only contact addresses.

Examples:

  • To serve a link to the Jabber User Directory on jabber.org:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_disco:
        extra_domains: ["users.jabber.org"]
      ...
    
  • To serve a link to the transports on another server:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_disco:
        extra_domains:
          - "icq.example.com"
          - "msn.example.com"
      ...
    
  • To serve a link to a few friendly servers:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_disco:
        extra_domains:
          - "example.org"
          - "example.com"
      ...
    
  • With this configuration, all services show abuse addresses, feedback address on the main server, and admin addresses for both the main server and the vJUD service:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_disco:
        server_info:
          -
            modules: all
            name: "abuse-addresses"
            urls: ["mailto:abuse@shakespeare.lit"]
          -
            modules: [mod_muc]
            name: "Web chatroom logs"
            urls: ["http://www.example.org/muc-logs"]
          -
            modules: [mod_disco]
            name: "feedback-addresses"
            urls:
              - "http://shakespeare.lit/feedback.php"
              - "mailto:feedback@shakespeare.lit"
              - "xmpp:feedback@shakespeare.lit"
          -
            modules:
              - mod_disco
              - mod_vcard
            name: "admin-addresses"
            urls:
              - "mailto:xmpp@shakespeare.lit"
              - "xmpp:admins@shakespeare.lit"
      ...
    

mod_echo

This module simply echoes any XMPP packet back to the sender. This mirror can be of interest for ejabberd and XMPP client debugging.

Options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘echo.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

Example: Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who is the most beautiful of them all?

modules:
  ...
  mod_echo:
    host: "mirror.example.org"
  ...

mod_fail2ban

The module bans IPs that show the malicious signs. Currently only C2S authentication failures are detected.

Available options:

c2s_auth_ban_lifetime: Seconds: The lifetime of the IP ban caused by too many C2S authentication failures. The default is 3600, i.e. one hour.

c2s_max_auth_failures: Integer: The number of C2S authentication failures to trigger the IP ban. The default is 20.

access: AccessName: Specify an access rule for whitelisting IP addresses or networks. If the rule returns ‘allow’ for a given IP address, that address will never be banned. The AccessName should be of type ip. The default value is none.

Example:

modules:
  ...
  mod_fail2ban:
    c2s_auth_block_lifetime: 7200
    c2s_max_auth_failures: 50
  ...

mod_http_bind

This module implements XMPP over Bosh (formerly known as HTTP Binding) as defined in XEP-0124 and XEP-0206. It extends ejabberd’s built in HTTP service with a configurable resource at which this service will be hosted.

To use HTTP-Binding, enable the module:

modules:
  ...
  mod_http_bind: {}
  ...

and add http_bind in the HTTP service. For example:

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5280
    module: ejabberd_http
    http_bind: true
    web_admin: true
  ...

With this configuration, the module will serve the requests sent to http://example.org:5280/http-bind/ Remember that this page is not designed to be used by web browsers, it is used by XMPP clients that support XMPP over Bosh.

If you want to set the service in a different URI path or use a different module, you can configure it manually using the option request_handlers. For example:

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5280
    module: ejabberd_http
    request_handlers:
       "/http-bind": mod_http_bind
    web_admin: true
  ...

Options:

{max_inactivity, Seconds}: Define the maximum inactivity period in seconds. Default value is 30 seconds. For example, to set 50 seconds:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_http_bind:
        max_inactivity: 50
      ...

mod_http_fileserver

This simple module serves files from the local disk over HTTP.

Options:

docroot: Path: Directory to serve the files.

accesslog: Path: File to log accesses using an Apache-like format. No log will be recorded if this option is not specified.

directory_indices: [Index, ...]: Indicate one or more directory index files, similarly to Apache’s DirectoryIndex variable. When a web request hits a directory instead of a regular file, those directory indices are looked in order, and the first one found is returned.

custom_headers: {Name: Value}: Indicate custom HTTP headers to be included in all responses. Default value is: []

content_types: {Name: Type}: Specify mappings of extension to content type. There are several content types already defined, with this option you can add new definitions, modify or delete existing ones. To delete an existing definition, simply define it with a value: ‘undefined’.

default_content_type: Type: Specify the content type to use for unknown extensions. Default value is ‘application/octet-stream’.

This example configuration will serve the files from the local directory /var/www in the address http://example.org:5280/pub/archive/. In this example a new content type ogg is defined, png is redefined, and jpg definition is deleted. To use this module you must enable it:

modules:
  ...
  mod_http_fileserver:
    docroot: "/var/www"
    accesslog: "/var/log/ejabberd/access.log"
    directory_indices:
      - "index.html"
      - "main.htm"
    custom_headers:
      "X-Powered-By": "Erlang/OTP"
      "X-Fry": "It's a widely-believed fact!"
    content_types:
      ".ogg": "audio/ogg"
      ".png": "image/png"
      ".jpg": undefined
    default_content_type: "text/html"
  ...

And define it as a handler in the HTTP service:

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5280
    module: ejabberd_http
    request_handlers:
      ...
      "/pub/archive": mod_http_fileserver
      ...
  ...

mod_http_upload

This module allows for requesting permissions to upload a file via HTTP as described in XEP-0363. If the request is accepted, the client receives a URL for uploading the file and another URL from which that file can later be downloaded. If an image file is uploaded, the server (by default) also creates a thumbnail.

In order to use this module, it must be configured as a request_handler for an ejabberd_http listener.

Options:

host: HostName: This option defines the JID for the HTTP upload service. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced with the virtual host name. Default: "upload.@HOST@".

name: Text: This option defines the Service Discovery name for the HTTP upload service. Default: "HTTP File Upload".

access: AccessName: This option defines the access rule to limit who is permitted to use the HTTP upload service. The default value is local. If no access rule of that name exists, no user will be allowed to use the service.

max_size: Size: This option limits the acceptable file size. Either a number of bytes (larger than zero) or infinity must be specified. Default: 104857600.

secret_length: Length: This option defines the length of the random string included in the GET and PUT URLs generated by mod_http_upload. The minimum length is 8 characters, but it is recommended to choose a larger value. Default: 40.

jid_in_url: node|sha1: When this option is set to node, the node identifier of the user's JID (i.e., the user name) is included in the GET and PUT URLs generated by mod_http_upload. Otherwise, a SHA-1 hash of the user's bare JID is included instead. Default: sha1.

thumbnail: true|false: This option specifies whether ejabberd should create thumbnails of uploaded images. If a thumbnail is created, a <thumbnail/> element that contains the download <uri/> and some metadata is returned with the PUT response. Default: true.

file_mode: Mode: This option defines the permission bits of uploaded files. The bits are specified as an octal number (see the chmod(1) manual page) within double quotes. For example: "0644". Default: undefined.

dir_mode: Mode: This option defines the permission bits of the docroot directory and any directories created during file uploads. The bits are specified as an octal number (see the chmod(1) manual page) within double quotes. For example: "0755". Default: undefined.

docroot: Path: Uploaded files are stored below the directory specified (as an absolute path) with this option. The keyword @HOME@ is replaced with the home directory of the user running ejabberd, and the keyword @HOST@ with the virtual host name. Default: "@HOME@/upload".

put_url: URL: This option specifies the initial part of the PUT URLs used for file uploads. The keyword @HOST@ is replaced with the virtual host name. Default: "http://@HOST@:5444". Note: Different virtual hosts cannot use the same PUT URL.

get_url: URL: This option specifies the initial part of the GET URLs used for downloading the files. By default, it is set to the same value as the put_url. The keyword @HOST@ is replaced with the virtual host name. Note: If GET requests are handled by mod_http_upload, the get_url must match the put_url. Setting it to a different value only makes sense if an external web server or mod_http_fileserver is used to serve the uploaded files.

service_url: URL: If a service_url is specified, upload slot requests are forwarded to this external service instead of being handled by mod_http_upload itself. Whenever an upload slot request is accepted as per the access rule, a HTTP GET query with jid, name, size, and content_type fields is issued. In order to accept the request, the service must return an HTTP status code of 200 or 201 and two lines of text/plain output. The first line is forwarded to the XMPP client as the PUT URL, the second line as the GET URL. In order to reject the request, the service should return a status code of 402 (resource-constraint), 403 (not-allowed), or 414 (not-acceptable). Default: undefined.

custom_headers: {Name: Value}: This option specifies additional header fields to be included in all HTTP responses. Default: [].

rm_on_unregister: true|false: This option specifies whether files uploaded by a user should be removed when that user is unregistered. Default: true.

Example:

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5443
    module: ejabberd_http
    tls: true
    certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/certificate.pem"
    request_handlers:
      ...
      "upload": mod_http_upload
      ...
  ...

modules:
  ...
  mod_http_upload:
    docroot: "/ejabberd/upload"
    put_url: "https://@HOST@:5443/upload"
  ...

mod_http_upload_quota

This module adds quota support for mod_http_upload.

Options:

max_days: Days: If a number larger than zero is specified, any files (and directories) older than this number of days are removed from the subdirectories of the docroot directory, once per day. Default: infinity.

access_hard_quota: AccessName: This option defines which access rule is used to specify the "hard quota" for the matching JIDs. That rule must yield a positive number for any JID that is supposed to have a quota limit. This is the number of megabytes a corresponding user may upload. When this threshold is exceeded, ejabberd deletes the oldest files uploaded by that user until their disk usage equals or falls below the specified soft quota (see below).

access_soft_quota: AccessName: This option defines which access rule is used to specify the "soft quota" for the matching JIDs. That rule must yield a positive number of megabytes for any JID that is supposed to have a quota limit. See the description of the access_hard_quota option for details.

Note: It's not necessary to specify the access_hard_quota and access_soft_quota options in order to use the quota feature. You can stick to the default names and just specify access rules such as those in the following example.

shaper_rules:
  ...
  soft_upload_quota:
    - 1000: all # MiB
  hard_upload_quota:
    - 1100: all # MiB
  ...

modules:
  ...
  mod_http_upload: {}
  mod_http_upload_quota:
    max_days: 100
  ...

mod_http_ws

This module enables xmpp communication over websocket connection as described in RFC 7395.

To enable this module it must have handler added to request_handlers section of ejabberd_http listener:

listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5280
    module: ejabberd_http
    request_handlers:
      ...
      "/xmpp": ejabberd_http_ws
      ...
  ...

This module can be configured by using those options that should be placed in general section of config file:

websocket_ping_interval: Seconds: Defines time between pings send by server to client (websocket level protocol pings are used for this) to keep connection active. If client won't respond to two corresponding pings connection will be assumed as closed. Value of 0 can be used to disable it feature. This options do make server send pings only for connections using rfc compilant protocol, for older style connections server expects that whitespace pings would be used for this purpose. Default value of this option is set to 60.

websocket_timeout: Seconds: Amount of time without any communication after which connection would be closed. The specified number of seconds must be larger than 0. This option is set to 300 by default.

mod_irc

This module is an IRC transport that can be used to join channels on IRC servers.

End user information:

  • A XMPP client with ‘groupchat 1.0’ support or Multi-User Chat support (XEP-0045) is necessary to join IRC channels.

  • An IRC channel can be joined in nearly the same way as joining a XMPP Multi-User Chat room. The difference is that the room name will be ‘channel%irc.example.org’ in case irc.example.org is the IRC server hosting ‘channel’. And of course the host should point to the IRC transport instead of the Multi-User Chat service.

  • You can register your nickame by sending ‘IDENTIFY password’ to nickserver!irc.example.org@irc.jabberserver.org.

  • Entering your password is possible by sending ‘LOGIN nick password’ to nickserver!irc.example.org@irc.jabberserver.org.

  • The IRC transport provides Ad-Hoc Commands (XEP-0050) to join a channel, and to set custom IRC username and encoding.

  • When using a popular XMPP server, it can occur that no connection can be achieved with some IRC servers because they limit the number of connections from one IP.

Options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘irc.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

access: AccessName: This option can be used to specify who may use the IRC transport (default value: all).

default_encoding: Encoding: Set the default IRC encoding. Default value: iso8859-1

Examples:

  • In the first example, the IRC transport is available on (all) your virtual host(s) with the prefix ‘irc.’. Furthermore, anyone is able to use the transport. The default encoding is set to “iso8859-15”.

    modules:
      ...
      mod_irc:
        access: all
        default_encoding: "iso8859-15"
      ...
    
  • In next example the IRC transport is available with JIDs with prefix irc-t.net. Moreover, the transport is only accessible to two users of example.org, and any user of example.com:

    acl:
      paying_customers:
        user:
          - "customer1": "example.org"
          - "customer2": "example.org"
        server: "example.com"
    
    access_rules:
      irc_users:
        - allow: paying_customers
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_irc:
        access: irc_users
        host: "irc.example.net"
      ...
    

mod_last

Description

This module adds support for Last Activity (XEP-0012). It can be used to discover when a disconnected user last accessed the server, to know when a connected user was last active on the server, or to query the uptime of the ejabberd server.

Options

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Last activity (jabber:iq:last) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

Example Configuration

modules:
  mod_last: {}

Implementation notes

You may want to disable that module depending on several parameters:

  • Privacy: You may not want to store the last presence of your users in database.
  • Performance: If you have usage pattern with large spike of disconneect, you may want to disable that module to limit trafic spike on your mod_last database backend.

Note that you may want also to purge last activity that is too old to limit the storage size of those data.

mod_mam

This module implements Message Archive Management as described in XEP-0313. Versions 0.2 and 0.3 are supported at the moment. Compatible XMPP clients can use it to store their chat history on the server.

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Message Archive Management IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

db_type: mnesia|sql: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database. Note: If mnesia is used, the total size of all MAM archives cannot exceed 2 GB. The delete_old_mam_messages command could be run periodically to make sure the mnesia data won't grow beyond that limit. To support larger archives, sql storage must be used.

default: always|never|roster: The option defines default policy for chat history. When always is set every chat message is stored. With roster only chat history with contacts from user's roster is stored. never fully disables chat history. Note that a client can change its policy via protocol commands. The default is never.

request_activates_archiving: true|false: If this option is enabled, no messages are stored for a user until his client issued a MAM request, regardless of the value of the default option. Once the server received a request, that user's messages are archived as usual. The default is false.

assume_mam_usage: true|false: This option determines how ejabberd's stream management code handles unacknowledged messages when the connection is lost. Usually, such messages are either bounced or resent. However, neither is done for messages that were stored in the user's MAM archive if this option is set to true. In this case, ejabberd assumes those messages will be retrieved from the archive. The default is false.

cache_size: Integer: There is a cache which is used to improve performance for retrieving user's policy. This option will allow you to set the size of this cache. The default is 1000 items.

cache_life_time: Seconds: Lifetime of the cached items in the cache described in the option cache_size. The default is 3600 seconds, i.e. one hour.

mod_mix

This module is an experimental implementation Mediated Information eXchange (MIX) as descrive in XEP-0369. Our implementation is base on version 0.1.

To feature will be added to ejabberd 16.03 as an experimental feature and is not yet ready to use in production.

To learn more about how to use that feature, you can refer to our tutorial: Getting started with XEP-0369: Mediated Information eXchange (MIX) v0.1.

mod_metrics

This module sends events to external backend (by now it only supports grapherl). Supported events are: sm_register_connection, sm_remove_connection, user_send_packet, user_receive_packet, s2s_send_packet, s2s_receive_packet, register_user, remove_user, offline_message.

When enabled, every call to these hooks triggers a counter event to the configured backend.

Backend is not configurable yet, by now it requires to be grapherl running in localhost and listening to port 11111.

mod_muc

This module provides a Multi-User Chat (XEP-0045) service. Users can discover existing rooms, join or create them. Occupants of a room can chat in public or have private chats.

Some of the features of Multi-User Chat:

  • Sending public and private messages to room occupants.

  • Inviting other users to a room.

  • Setting a room subject.

  • Creating password protected rooms.

  • Kicking and banning occupants.

The MUC service allows any Jabber ID to register a nickname, so nobody else can use that nickname in any room in the MUC service. To register a nickname, open the Service Discovery in your XMPP client and register in the MUC service.

This module supports clustering and load balancing. One module can be started per cluster node. Rooms are distributed at creation time on all available MUC module instances. The multi-user chat module is clustered but the rooms themselves are not clustered nor fault-tolerant: if the node managing a set of rooms goes down, the rooms disappear and they will be recreated on an available node on first connection attempt.

Module options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘conference.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

access: AccessName: You can specify who is allowed to use the Multi-User Chat service. By default everyone is allowed to use it.

access_create: AccessName: To configure who is allowed to create new rooms at the Multi-User Chat service, this option can be used. By default any account in the local ejabberd server is allowed to create rooms.

access_persistent: AccessName: To configure who is allowed to modify the ’persistent’ room option. By default any account in the local ejabberd server is allowed to modify that option.

access_admin: AccessName: This option specifies who is allowed to administrate the Multi-User Chat service. The default value is none, which means that only the room creator can administer his room. The administrators can send a normal message to the service JID, and it will be shown in all active rooms as a service message. The administrators can send a groupchat message to the JID of an active room, and the message will be shown in the room as a service message.

history_size: Size: A small history of the current discussion is sent to users when they enter the room. With this option you can define the number of history messages to keep and send to users joining the room. The value is an integer. Setting the value to 0 disables the history feature and, as a result, nothing is kept in memory. The default value is 20. This value is global and thus affects all rooms on the service.

max_users: Number: This option defines at the service level, the maximum number of users allowed per room. It can be lowered in each room configuration but cannot be increased in individual room configuration. The default value is 200.

max_users_admin_threshold: Number: This option defines the number of service admins or room owners allowed to enter the room when the maximum number of allowed occupants was reached. The default limit is 5.

max_user_conferences: Number: This option defines the maximum number of rooms that any given user can join. The default value is 10. This option is used to prevent possible abuses. Note that this is a soft limit: some users can sometimes join more conferences in cluster configurations.

max_room_id: Number: This option defines the maximum number of characters that Room ID can have when creating a new room. The default value is to not limit: infinity.

regexp_room_id: String: This option defines the regular expression that a Room ID must satisfy to allow the room creation. The default value is the empty string.

max_room_name: Number: This option defines the maximum number of characters that Room Name can have when configuring the room. The default value is to not limit: infinity.

max_room_desc: Number: This option defines the maximum number of characters that Room Description can have when configuring the room. The default value is to not limit: infinity.

min_message_interval: Number: This option defines the minimum interval between two messages send by an occupant in seconds. This option is global and valid for all rooms. A decimal value can be used. When this option is not defined, message rate is not limited. This feature can be used to protect a MUC service from occupant abuses and limit number of messages that will be broadcasted by the service. A good value for this minimum message interval is 0.4 second. If an occupant tries to send messages faster, an error is send back explaining that the message has been discarded and describing the reason why the message is not acceptable.

min_presence_interval: Number: This option defines the minimum of time between presence changes coming from a given occupant in seconds. This option is global and valid for all rooms. A decimal value can be used. When this option is not defined, no restriction is applied. This option can be used to protect a MUC service for occupants abuses. If an occupant tries to change its presence more often than the specified interval, the presence is cached by ejabberd and only the last presence is broadcasted to all occupants in the room after expiration of the interval delay. Intermediate presence packets are silently discarded. A good value for this option is 4 seconds.

max_users_presence: Number: This option defines after how many users in the room, it is considered overcrowded. When a MUC room is considered overcrowed, presence broadcasts are limited to reduce load, traffic and excessive presence 'storm' received by participants.

default_room_options: {OptionName: OptionValue}: This module option allows to define the desired default room options. Note that the creator of a room can modify the options of his room at any time using an XMPP client with MUC capability. The available room options and the default values are:

  • allow_change_subj: true|false: Allow occupants to change the subject.

  • allow_private_messages: true|false: Occupants can send private messages to other occupants.

  • allow_private_messages_from_visitors: anyone|moderators|nobody: Visitors can send private messages to other occupants.

  • allow_query_users: true|false: Occupants can send IQ queries to other occupants.

  • allow_user_invites: false|true: Allow occupants to send invitations.

  • allow_visitor_nickchange: true|false: Allow visitors to change nickname.

  • allow_visitor_status: true|false: Allow visitors to send status text in presence updates. If disallowed, the status text is stripped before broadcasting the presence update to all the room occupants.

  • anonymous: true|false: The room is anonymous: occupants don’t see the real JIDs of other occupants. Note that the room moderators can always see the real JIDs of the occupants.

  • captcha_protected: false|true: When a user tries to join a room where he has no affiliation (not owner, admin or member), the room requires him to fill a CAPTCHA challenge (see section CAPTCHA) in order to accept her join in the room.

  • logging: false|true: The public messages are logged using mod_muc_log.

  • mam: false|true: Enable message archiving. Implies mod_mam is enabled.

  • max_users: 200: Maximum number of occupants in the room.

  • members_by_default: true|false: The occupants that enter the room are participants by default, so they have ’voice’.

  • members_only: false|true: Only members of the room can enter.

  • moderated: true|false: Only occupants with ’voice’ can send public messages.

  • password: roompass123: Password of the room. You may want to enable the next option too.

  • password_protected: false|true: The password is required to enter the room.

  • persistent: false|true: The room persists even if the last participant leaves.

  • public: true|false: The room is public in the list of the MUC service, so it can be discovered.

  • public_list: true|false: The list of participants is public, without requiring to enter the room.

  • title: Room Title: A human-readable title of the room.

    All of those room options can be set to true or false, except password and title which are strings, and max_users that is integer.

Examples:

  • In the first example everyone is allowed to use the Multi-User Chat service. Everyone will also be able to create new rooms but only the user admin@example.org is allowed to administrate any room. In this example he is also a global administrator. When admin@example.org sends a message such as ‘Tomorrow, the XMPP server will be moved to new hardware. This will involve service breakdowns around 23:00 UMT. We apologise for this inconvenience.’ to conference.example.org, it will be displayed in all active rooms. In this example the history feature is disabled.

    acl:
      admin:
        user:
          - "admin": "example.org"
    
    access_rules:
      muc_admin:
        - allow: admin
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_muc:
        access: all
        access_create: all
        access_admin: muc_admin
        history_size: 0
      ...
    
  • In the second example the Multi-User Chat service is only accessible by paying customers registered on our domains and on other servers. Of course the administrator is also allowed to access rooms. In addition, he is the only authority able to create and administer rooms. When admin@example.org sends a message such as ‘Tomorrow, the Jabber server will be moved to new hardware. This will involve service breakdowns around 23:00 UMT. We apologise for this inconvenience.’ to conference.example.org, it will be displayed in all active rooms. No history_size option is used, this means that the feature is enabled and the default value of 20 history messages will be send to the users.

    acl:
      paying_customers:
        user:
          - "customer1": "example.net"
          - "customer2": "example.com"
          - "customer3": "example.org"
      admin:
        user:
          - "admin": "example.org"
    
    access_rules:
      muc_admin
        - allow: admin
      muc_access:
        - allow: paying_customers
        - allow: admin
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_muc:
        access: muc_access
        access_create: muc_admin
        access_admin: muc_admin
      ...
    
  • In the following example, MUC anti abuse options are used. An occupant cannot send more than one message every 0.4 seconds and cannot change its presence more than once every 4 seconds. The Room IDs can contain only letters and numbers. The length of Room IDs and Room Names are limited to 20 characters, and Room Description to 300 characters. No ACLs are defined, but some user restriction could be added as well:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_muc:
        min_message_interval: 0.4
        min_presence_interval: 4
        regexp_room_id: "^[a-z0-9]+$"
        max_room_id: 20
        max_room_name: 20
        max_room_desc: 300
      ...
    
  • This example shows how to use default_room_options to make sure the newly created rooms have by default those options.

    modules:
      ...
      mod_muc:
        access: muc_access
        access_create: muc_admin
        default_room_options:
          allow_change_subj: false
          allow_query_users: true
          allow_private_messages: true
          members_by_default: false
          title: "New chatroom"
          anonymous: false
        access_admin: muc_admin
      ...
    

mod_muc_log

This module enables optional logging of Multi-User Chat (MUC) public conversations to HTML. Once you enable this module, users can join a room using a MUC capable XMPP client, and if they have enough privileges, they can request the configuration form in which they can set the option to enable room logging.

Features:

  • Room details are added on top of each page: room title, JID, author, subject and configuration.

  • The room JID in the generated HTML is a link to join the room (using XMPP URI).

  • Subject and room configuration changes are tracked and displayed.

  • Joins, leaves, nick changes, kicks, bans and ‘/me’ are tracked and displayed, including the reason if available.

  • Generated HTML files are XHTML 1.0 Transitional and CSS compliant.

  • Timestamps are self-referencing links.

  • Links on top for quicker navigation: Previous day, Next day, Up.

  • CSS is used for style definition, and a custom CSS file can be used.

  • URLs on messages and subjects are converted to hyperlinks.

  • Timezone used on timestamps is shown on the log files.

  • A custom link can be added on top of each page.

Options:

access_log: AccessName: This option restricts which occupants are allowed to enable or disable room logging. The default value is muc_admin. Note for this default setting you need to have an access rule for muc_admin in order to take effect.

cssfile: false|URL: With this option you can set whether the HTML files should have a custom CSS file or if they need to use the embedded CSS file. Allowed values are false and an URL to a CSS file. With the first value, HTML files will include the embedded CSS code. With the latter, you can specify the URL of the custom CSS file (for example: http://example.com/my.css). The default value is false.

dirname: room_jid|room_name: Allows to configure the name of the room directory. Allowed values are room_jid and room_name. With the first value, the room directory name will be the full room JID. With the latter, the room directory name will be only the room name, not including the MUC service name. The default value is room_jid.

dirtype: subdirs|plain: The type of the created directories can be specified with this option. Allowed values are subdirs and plain. With the first value, subdirectories are created for each year and month. With the latter, the names of the log files contain the full date, and there are no subdirectories. The default value is subdirs.

file_format: html|plaintext: Define the format of the log files: html stores in HTML format, plaintext stores in plain text. The default value is html.

file_permissions: {mode: Mode, group: Group}: Define the permissions that must be used when creating the log files: the number of the mode, and the numeric id of the group that will own the files. The default value is {644, 33}.

outdir: Path: This option sets the full path to the directory in which the HTML files should be stored. Make sure the ejabberd daemon user has write access on that directory. The default value is www/muc.

spam_prevention: true|false: To prevent spam, the spam_prevention option adds a special attribute to links that prevent their indexation by search engines. The default value is true, which mean that nofollow attributes will be added to user submitted links.

timezone: local|universal: The time zone for the logs is configurable with this option. Allowed values are local and universal. With the first value, the local time, as reported to Erlang by the operating system, will be used. With the latter, GMT/UTC time will be used. The default value is local.

top_link: {URL: Text}: With this option you can customize the link on the top right corner of each log file. The default value is {/, Home}.

Examples:

  • In the first example any room owner can enable logging, and a custom CSS file will be used, http://example.com/my.css. The names of the log files will contain the full date, and there will be no subdirectories. The log files will be stored in /var/www/muclogs, and the time zone will be GMT/UTC. Finally, the top link will be <a href="http://www.jabber.ru/">Jabber.ru</a>.

    access_rules:
      - muc: allow
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_muc_log:
        access_log: muc
        cssfile: "http://example.com/my.css"
        dirtype: plain
        dirname: room_jid
        outdir: "/var/www/muclogs"
        timezone: universal
        spam_prevention: true
        top_link:
          "http://www.jabber.ru/": "Jabber.ru"
      ...
    
  • In the second example only admin1@example.org and admin2@example.net can enable logging, and the embedded CSS file will be used. The names of the log files will only contain the day (number), and there will be subdirectories for each year and month. The log files will be stored in /var/www/muclogs, and the local time will be used. Finally, the top link will be the default <a href="/">Home</a>.

    acl:
      admin:
        user:
          - "admin1": "example.org"
          - "admin2": "example.net"
    access_rules:
      muc_log:
        - allow: admin
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_muc_log:
        access_log: muc_log
        cssfile: false
        dirtype: subdirs
        file_permissions:
          mode: 644
          group: 33
        outdir: "/var/www/muclogs"
        timezone: local
      ...
    

mod_multicast

This module implements a service for Extended Stanza Addressing (XEP-0033)

Configurable options:

host: Define the hostname of the service. Default value: "multicast.SERVER"

access: Specify who can send packets to the multicast service. Default value: all

limits: Specify a list of custom limits which override the default ones defined in XEP-0033. Limits are defined with this syntax: {Sender_type, Stanza_type, Number} Where: Sender_type can have values: local or remote. Stanza_type can have values: message or presence. Number can be a positive integer or the key word infinite. Default value: []

Example configuration:

# Only admins can send packets to multicast service
access_rules:
  multicast:
    - allow: admin

# If you want to allow all your users:
access_rules:
  multicast:
    - allow

# This allows both admins and remote users to send packets,
# but does not allow local users
acl:
  allservers:
    server_glob: "*"
access_rules:
  multicast:
    - allow: admin
    - deny: local
    - allow: allservers

modules:
  mod_multicast:
     host: "multicast.example.org"
     access: multicast
     limits: "> [ {local,message,40}, {local,presence,infinite}, {remote,message,150} ]."

mod_offline

Description

This module implements offline message storage (XEP-0160) and flexible offline message retrieval (XEP-0013). This means that all messages sent to an offline user will be stored on the server until that user comes online again. Thus it is very similar to how email works. A user is considered offline if no session presence priority > 0 are currently open.

Note that ejabberdctl has a command to delete expired messages (see section Managing: ejabberdctl).

Options

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

access_max_user_messages: AccessName: This option defines which access rule (atom) will be enforced to limit the maximum number of offline messages that a user can have (quota). When a user has too many offline messages, any new messages that he receive are discarded, and a resource-constraint error is returned to the sender. The default value is max_user_offline_messages. Then you can define an access rule with a syntax similar to max_user_sessions (see Limiting Opened Sessions with ACL).

store_empty_body: true|false|unless_chat_state: Whether or not to store messages that lack a <body/> element. The default value is unless_chat_state, which tells ejabberd to store messages even if they lack the <body/> element, unless they only contain a chat state notification (as defined in XEP-0085).

pool_size: Size: This option specifies the size of the worker pool for storing offline messages. The allowed values are positive integers. Default value: 16.

Example Configuration

This example allows power users to have as much as 5000 offline messages, administrators up to 2000, and all the other users up to 100.

acl:
  admin:
    user:
      - "admin1": "localhost"
      - "admin2": "example.org"
  poweruser:
    user:
      - "bob": "example.org"
      - "jane": "example.org"

shaper_rules:
  max_user_offline_messages:
    - 5000: poweruser
    - 2000: admin
    - 100

modules:
  ...
  mod_offline:
    access_max_user_messages: max_user_offline_messages
  ...

Implementation notes

You have several approach for a client to learn what happened when it was offline:

  • offline storage: This is adequate especially when a single client is typically used at a time.
  • message archive (MAM): This is a new archiving feature. A client (for example a mobile client) can use it to resync its own history with what happened when it was offline. In that case, the client is responsible for marking messages it considers new as "unread". See mod_mam.

Some clients may rely on offline and/or message archives to catch up on messages on reconnect, but client developers should always consider interactions with those two modules together.

mod_ping

This module implements support for XMPP Ping (XEP-0199) and periodic keepalives. When this module is enabled ejabberd responds correctly to ping requests, as defined in the protocol.

Configuration options:

send_pings: true|false: If this option is set to true, the server sends pings to connected clients that are not active in a given interval ping_interval. This is useful to keep client connections alive or checking availability. By default this option is disabled.

ping_interval: Seconds: How often to send pings to connected clients, if the previous option is enabled. If a client connection does not send or receive any stanza in this interval, a ping request is sent to the client. The default value is 60 seconds.

ping_ack_timeout: Seconds: How long to wait before deeming that a client has not answered a given server ping request. default value is 32 seconds.

timeout_action: none|kill: What to do when a client does not answer to a server ping request in less than ping_ack_timeout. The default is to do nothing.

This example enables Ping responses, configures the module to send pings to client connections that are inactive for 4 minutes, and if a client does not answer to the ping in less than 32 seconds, its connection is closed:

modules:
  ...
  mod_ping:
    send_pings: true
    ping_interval: 240
    timeout_action: kill
  ...

mod_pres_counter

This module detects flood/spam in presence subscription stanza traffic. If a user sends or receives more of those stanzas in a time interval, the exceeding stanzas are silently dropped, and warning is logged.

Configuration options:

count: StanzaNumber: The number of subscription presence stanzas (subscribe, unsubscribe, subscribed, unsubscribed) allowed for any direction (input or output) per time interval. Please note that two users subscribing to each other usually generate 4 stanzas, so the recommended value is 4 or more. The default value is: 5.

interval: Seconds: The time interval defined in seconds. The default value is 60.

This example enables the module, and allows up to 5 presence subscription stanzas to be sent or received by the users in 60 seconds:

modules:
  ...
  mod_pres_counter:
    count: 5
    interval: 60
  ...

mod_privacy

This module implements XEP-0016: Privacy Lists`. If end users have support for it in their XMPP client, they will be able to:

  • Retrieving one’s privacy lists.
  • Adding, removing, and editing one’s privacy lists.
  • Setting, changing, or declining active lists.
  • Setting, changing, or declining the default list (i.e., the list that is active by default).
  • Allowing or blocking messages based on JID, group, or subscription type (or globally).
  • Allowing or blocking inbound presence notifications based on JID, group, or subscription type (or globally).
  • Allowing or blocking outbound presence notifications based on JID, group, or subscription type (or globally).
  • Allowing or blocking IQ stanzas based on JID, group, or subscription type (or globally).
  • Allowing or blocking all communications based on JID, group, or subscription type (or globally).

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Blocking Communication (jabber:iq:privacy) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

mod_private

This module adds support for Private XML Storage (XEP-0049):

Using this method, XMPP entities can store private data on the server and retrieve it whenever necessary. The data stored might be anything, as long as it is valid XML. One typical usage for this namespace is the server-side storage of client-specific preferences; another is Bookmark Storage (XEP-0048).

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Private XML Storage (jabber:iq:private) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

mod_privilege

This module is an implementation of (XEP-0356). This extension allows components to have privileged access to other entity data (send messages on behalf of the server, get/set user roster, access presence information). This may be applied for external PEP service.

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Privileged Entity (urn:xmpp:privilege) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

Example:

If you want to grant privileged access to a component, specify it in the component configurations, e.g.:

    listen:
      ...
      -
        port: 8888
        module: ejabberd_service
        hosts:
          "sat-pubsub.example.org":
            password: "secret"
        privilege_access:
          roster: "get"
          message: "outgoing"
      ...

In the example above, the sat-pubsub.example.org component can get the roster of every user of the server and send messages on behalf of the server.

Permission list

By default a component does not have any priviliged access. It is worth noting that the permissions listed below give access to data belonging to all server users.

Possible permissions:

  • presence
    • managed_entity: receive server user presence.
    • roster: the component is allowed to receive the presence of both the users and the contacts in their roster.
  • message
    • outgoing: the component is allowed to send messages on behalf of either the server or a bare JID of server users.
  • roster
    • get: read access to a user's roster.
    • set: write access to a user's roster.
    • both: read/write access to a user's roster.

Security issue

Privileged access gives components access to sensitive data, so permission should be granted carefully, only if you trust a component.

Note

This module is complementary to mod_delegation (XEP-0355) but can also be used separately.

mod_proxy65

This module implements SOCKS5 Bytestreams (XEP-0065). It allows ejabberd to act as a file transfer proxy between two XMPP clients.

Options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘proxy.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

name: Text: Defines Service Discovery name of the service. Default is SOCKS5 Bytestreams.

ip: IP: This option specifies which network interface to listen for. Default is an IP address of the service’s DNS name, or, if fails, "127.0.0.1".

port: Number: This option defines port to listen for incoming connections. Default is 7777.

hostname: HostName: Defines a hostname advertised by the service when establishing a session with clients. This is useful when you run the service behind a NAT. The default is the value of ip option. Examples: proxy.mydomain.org, 200.150.100.50. Note that not all clients understand domain names in stream negotiation, so you should think twice before setting domain name in this option.

auth_type: anonymous|plain: SOCKS5 authentication type. Possible values are anonymous and plain. Default is anonymous.

access: AccessName: Defines ACL for file transfer initiators. Default is all.

max_connections: Number: Maximum number of active connections per file transfer initiator. No limit by default.

shaper: none|ShaperName: This option defines shaper for the file transfer peers. Shaper with the maximum bandwidth will be selected. Default is none.

Examples:

  • The simpliest configuration of the module:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_proxy65: {}
      ...
    
  • More complicated configuration.

    acl:
      admin:
        user:
          - "admin": "example.org"
      proxy_users:
        server:
          - "example.org"
    
    access_rules:
      proxy65_access:
        - allow: proxy_users
    shaper_rules:
      proxy65_shaper:
        - none: admin
        - proxyrate: proxy_users
    
    shaper:
      proxyrate: 10240
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_proxy65:
        host: "proxy1.example.org"
        name: "File Transfer Proxy"
        ip: "200.150.100.1"
        port: 7778
        max_connections: 5
        access: proxy65_access
        shaper: proxy65_shaper
      ...
    

mod_pubsub

This module offers a Publish-Subscribe Service (XEP-0060). The functionality in mod_pubsub can be extended using plugins. The plugin that implements PEP (Personal Eventing via Pubsub) (XEP-0163) is enabled in the default ejabberd configuration file, and it requires mod_caps.

Options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘pubsub.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

If you use `mod_pubsub` with `sql` `db_type`, please ensure the
prefix contains only one dot, for example ‘`pubsub.`’, or
‘`publish.`’,.

access_createnode: AccessName: This option restricts which users are allowed to create pubsub nodes using ACL and ACCESS. By default any account in the local ejabberd server is allowed to create pubsub nodes.

max_items_node: MaxItems: Define the maximum number of items that can be stored in a node. Default value is 10.

max_subscriptions_node: MaxSubs: Define the maximum number of subscriptions managed by a node. Default value is undefined; no limitation.

plugins: [ Plugin, ...]: To specify which pubsub node plugins to use. The first one in the list is used by default. If this option is not defined, the default plugins list is: [flat]. PubSub clients can define which plugin to use when creating a node: add type=’plugin-name’ attribute to the create stanza element.

The “flat” plugin handles the default behavour and follows standard
XEP-0060 implementation.

The “hometree” plugin allows to manages nodes in a simple tree and
name nodes like files on a filesystem. A node Owner can only create
node and subnodes with names /home/owner/xxx and /home/domain/owner/xxx.
Each “hometree” node can have none, one, or many child nodes and also
have items.

The “pep” plugin adds extention to handle Personal Eventing Protocol
([`XEP-0163`](http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0163.html)) to the PubSub
engine. Adding pep plugin to PubSub make it handle PEP automatically.

The “mix” plugin is an experimental implementation of
Mediated Information eXchange
([`XEP-0369`](http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0369.html)).

The “mb” plugin is a PEP microglobing experimentation.

The “dag” plugin provides experimental support for PubSub Collection
Nodes (see dag nodetree bellow).

The “dispatch” plugin publishes items to node and all child subnodes
using the hometree behaviour. Node name must match hometree name
requirements. Publishing item to /home/server/user/a also publish
the item to node /home/server/user/a/a and /home/server/user/a/b.

The “online” plugin only cope with online users, by automatically
remove subscriptions and nodes of disconnecting users.

Other experimentale node plugins are provided. Each plugin comes with
it's own list of default node configuration and pubsub feature, and
can delegate calls to node_flat for default behaviour.

nodetree: Nodetree: To specify which nodetree to use. If not defined, the default pubsub nodetree is used: “tree”. Only one nodetree can be used per host, and is shared by all node plugins.

The “tree” nodetree store node configuration and relations on the
database. “flat” nodes are stored without any relationship, and
“hometree” nodes can have child nodes.

The “virtual” nodetree does not store nodes on database. This saves
resources on systems with tons of nodes. If using the “virtual”
nodetree, you can only enable those node plugins: [“flat”,“pep”] or
[“flat”]; any other plugins configuration will not work. Also, all
nodes will have the defaut configuration, and this can not be
changed. Using “virtual” nodetree requires to start from a clean
database, it will not work if you used the default “tree” nodetree
before.

The “dag” nodetree provides experimental support for PubSub
Collection Nodes
([`XEP-0248`](http://xmpp.org/extensions/xep-0248.html)). In that
case you should also add “dag” node plugin as default, for example:
`plugins: [dag,flat,hometree,pep]`

ignore_pep_from_offline: false|true: To specify whether or not we should get last published PEP items from users in our roster which are offline when we connect. Value is true or false. If not defined, pubsub assumes true so we only get last items of online contacts.

last_item_cache: false|true: To specify whether or not pubsub should cache last items. Value is true or false. If not defined, pubsub do not cache last items. On systems with not so many nodes, caching last items speeds up pubsub and allows to raise user connection rate. The cost is memory usage, as every item is stored in memory.

default_node_config: Config: To override default node configuration, regradless of node plugin. Value is a list of key-value definition. Node configuration still uses default configuration defined by node plugin, and overrides any items by value defined in this configurable list.

pep_mapping: {Key, Value}: This allow to define a Key-Value list to choose defined node plugins on given PEP namespace. The following example will use node_tune instead of node_pep for every PEP node with tune namespace:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_pubsub:
        pep_mapping:
          "http://jabber.org/protocol/tune": "tune"
      ...

Example of configuration that uses flat nodes as default, and allows use of flat, hometree and pep nodes:

modules:
  ...
  mod_pubsub:
    access_createnode: pubsub_createnode
    max_subscriptions_node: 100
    default_node_config:
      notification_type: normal
      notify_retract: false
      max_items: 4
    plugins:
      - "flat"
      - "hometree"
      - "pep"
  ...

Using relational database requires using mod_pubsub with db_type sql. Only flat, hometree and pep plugins supports SQL. The following example shows previous configuration with SQL usage:

modules:
  ...
  mod_pubsub:
    db_type: sql
    access_createnode: pubsub_createnode
    ignore_pep_from_offline: true
    last_item_cache: false
    plugins:
      - "flat"
      - "hometree"
      - "pep"
  ...

mod_register

This module adds support for In-Band Registration (XEP-0077). This protocol enables end users to use a XMPP client to:

  • Register a new account on the server.

  • Change the password from an existing account on the server.

  • Delete an existing account on the server.

Options:

access: AccessName: Specify rules to restrict what usernames can be registered and unregistered. If a rule returns ‘deny’ on the requested username, registration and unregistration of that user name is denied. There are no restrictions by default.

access_from: AccessName: By default, ejabberd doesn’t allow to register new accounts from s2s or existing c2s sessions. You can change it by defining access rule in this option. Use with care: allowing registration from s2s leads to uncontrolled massive accounts creation by rogue users. Additionally, if set to 'none', then In Band Registration is not advertised as a stream feature.

captcha_protected: false|true: Protect registrations with CAPTCHA (see section CAPTCHA). The default is false.

ip_access: AccessName: Define rules to allow or deny account registration depending on the IP address of the XMPP client. The AccessName should be of type ip. The default value is all.

password_strength: Entropy: This option sets the minimum informational entropy for passwords. The value Entropy is a number of bits of entropy. The recommended minimum is 32 bits. The default is 0, i.e. no checks are performed.

welcome_message: {subject: Subject, body: Body}: Set a welcome message that is sent to each newly registered account. The first string is the subject, and the second string is the message body.

registration_watchers: [ JID, ...]: This option defines a list of JIDs which will be notified each time a new account is registered.

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for In-Band Registration (jabber:iq:register) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

This module reads also another option defined globally for the server: registration_timeout: Timeout. This option limits the frequency of registration from a given IP or username. So, a user that tries to register a new account from the same IP address or JID during this number of seconds after his previous registration will receive an error resource-constraint with the explanation: “Users are not allowed to register accounts so quickly”. The timeout is expressed in seconds, and it must be an integer. To disable this limitation, instead of an integer put a word like: infinity. Default value: 600 seconds.

Examples:

  • Next example prohibits the registration of too short account names, and allows to create accounts only to clients of the local network:

    acl:
      loopback:
        ip:
          - "127.0.0.0/8"
          - "::1"
      shortname:
        user_glob:
          - "?"
          - "??"
        ## The same using regexp:
        ##user_regexp: "^..?$"
    
    access_rules:
      mynetworks:
        - allow: loopback
      register:
        - deny: shortname
        - allow: all
    
    modules:
      mod_register:
        ip_access: mynetworks
        access: register
    
  • This configuration prohibits usage of In-Band Registration to create or delete accounts, but allows existing accounts to change the password:

    access_rules:
      register:
        - deny
    
    modules:
      ...
      mod_register:
        access: register
      ...
    
  • This configuration disables all In-Band Registration functionality: create, delete accounts and change password:

    modules:
      ...
      ## mod_register:
      ##   access: register
      ...
    
  • Define the welcome message and two registration watchers. Also define a registration timeout of one hour:

    registration_timeout: 3600
    modules:
      ...
      mod_register:
        welcome_message:
          subject: "Welcome!"
          body: |-
            Hi.
            Welcome to this Jabber server.
            Check http://www.jabber.org
    
            Bye
        registration_watchers:
          - "admin1@example.org"
          - "boss@example.net"
      ...
    

mod_register_web

This module provides a web page where people can:

  • Register a new account on the server.

  • Change the password from an existing account on the server.

  • Delete an existing account on the server.

This module supports CAPTCHA image to register a new account. To enable this feature, configure the options captcha_cmd and captcha_host.

Options:

registration_watchers: [ JID, ...]: This option defines a list of JIDs which will be notified each time a new account is registered.

This example configuration shows how to enable the module and the web handler:

hosts:
  - "localhost"
  - "example.org"
  - "example.com"
listen:
  ...
  -
    port: 5281
    module: ejabberd_http
    register: true
    certfile: "/etc/ejabberd/certificate.pem"
    tls: true
  ...

modules:
  ...
  mod_register_web: {}
  ...

For example, the users of the host example.org can visit the page: https://example.org:5281/register/ It is important to include the last / character in the URL, otherwise the subpages URL will be incorrect.

mod_roster

This module implements roster management as defined in RFC 6121: XMPP IM. It also supports Roster Versioning (XEP-0237).

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Roster Management (jabber:iq:roster) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

versioning: false|true: Enables Roster Versioning. This option is disabled by default.

store_current_id: false|true: If this option is enabled, the current version number is stored on the database. If disabled, the version number is calculated on the fly each time. Enabling this option reduces the load for both ejabberd and the database. This option does not affect the client in any way. This option is only useful if Roster Versioning is enabled. This option is disabled by default. Important: if you use mod_shared_roster or mod_shared_roster_ldap, you must disable this option.

access: This option can be configured to specify rules to restrict roster management. If a rule returns ‘deny’ on the requested user name, that user cannot modify his personal roster: not add/remove/modify contacts, or subscribe/unsubscribe presence. By default there aren’t restrictions.

managers: List of remote entities that can manage users rosters using Remote Roster Management (XEP-0321). The protocol sections implemented are: 4.2. The remote entity requests current user’s roster. 4.3. The user updates roster. 4.4. The remote entity updates the user’s roster. A remote entity cab only get or modify roster items that have the same domain as the entity. Default value is: [].

This example configuration enables Roster Versioning with storage of current id. The ICQ and MSN transports can get ICQ and MSN contacts, add them, or remove them for any local account:

modules:
  ...
  mod_roster:
    versioning: true
    store_current_id: true
    managers:
     - "icq.example.org"
     - "msn.example.org"
  ...

With this example configuration, only admins can manage their rosters; everybody else cannot modify the roster:

acl:
  admin:
    user:
      - "sarah": "example.org"
access_rules:
  roster:
    - allow: admin

modules:
  ...
  mod_roster:
    access: roster
  ...

mod_service_log

This module adds support for logging end user packets via a XMPP message auditing service such as Bandersnatch. All user packets are encapsulated in a <route/> element and sent to the specified service(s).

Options:

loggers: [Names, ...]: With this option a (list of) service(s) that will receive the packets can be specified.

Examples:

  • To log all end user packets to the Bandersnatch service running on bandersnatch.example.com:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_service_log:
        loggers: ["bandersnatch.example.com"]
      ...
    
  • To log all end user packets to the Bandersnatch service running on bandersnatch.example.com and the backup service on bandersnatch.example.org:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_service_log:
        loggers:
          - "bandersnatch.example.com"
          - "bandersnatch.example.org"
      ...
    

mod_shared_roster

This module enables you to create shared roster groups. This means that you can create groups of people that can see members from (other) groups in their rosters. The big advantages of this feature are that end users do not need to manually add all users to their rosters, and that they cannot permanently delete users from the shared roster groups. A shared roster group can have members from any XMPP server, but the presence will only be available from and to members of the same virtual host where the group is created.

It still allows the users to have / add their own contacts, as it does not replace the standard roster. Instead, the shared roster contacts are merged to the revelant users at retrieval time. The standard user rosters thus stay unmodified.

Special values like @all@ and @online@ will help populating the shared roster dynamically. It means that the actual list of members in those shared rosters is generated dynamically at retrieval time.

Note: mod_shared_roster depends on mod_roster being enabled. Roster queries will return 503 errors if mod_roster is not enabled.

Options:

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

Shared roster groups can be edited only via the Web Admin. Each group has a unique identification and the following parameters:

  • Name: The name of the group, which will be displayed in the roster.

  • Description: The description of the group. This parameter does not affect anything.

  • Members: A list of JIDs of group members, entered one per line in the Web Admin. The special member directive @all@ represents all the registered users in the virtual host; which is only recommended for a small server with just a few hundred users. The special member directive @online@ represents the online users in the virtual host.

  • Displayed groups: A list of groups that will be in the rosters of this group’s members. A group of other vhost can be identified with groupid@vhost

Examples:

  • Take the case of a computer club that wants all its members seeing each other in their rosters. To achieve this, they need to create a shared roster group similar to this one:

    Identification: Group ‘club_members

    Name: Club Members

    Description: Members from the computer club

    Members: member1@example.org, member2@example.org, member3@example.org

    Displayed groups: club_members

  • In another case we have a company which has three divisions: Management, Marketing and Sales. All group members should see all other members in their rosters. Additionally, all managers should have all marketing and sales people in their roster. Simultaneously, all marketeers and the whole sales team should see all managers. This scenario can be achieved by creating shared roster groups as shown in the following lists:

    First list:

    Identification: Group ‘management

    Name: Management

    Description: Management

    Members: manager1@example.org, manager2@example.org

    Displayed groups: management, marketing, sales

    Second list:

    Identification: Group ‘marketing

    Name: Marketing

    Description: Marketing

    Members: marketeer1@example.org, marketeer2@example.org, marketeer3@example.org

    Displayed groups: management, marketing

    Third list:

    Identification: Group ‘sales

    Name: Sales

    Description: Sales

    Members: salesman1@example.org, salesman2@example.org, salesman3@example.org

    Displayed groups: management, sales

mod_shared_roster_ldap

This module lets the server administrator automatically populate users’ rosters (contact lists) with entries based on users and groups defined in an LDAP-based directory.

Note: mod_shared_roster_ldap depends on mod_roster being enabled. Roster queries will return 503 errors if mod_roster is not enabled.

Configuration parameters

The module accepts the following configuration parameters. Some of them, if unspecified, default to the values specified for the top level of configuration. This lets you avoid specifying, for example, the bind password, in multiple places.

Filters

These parameters specify LDAP filters used to query for shared roster information. All of them are run against the ldap_base.

ldap_rfilter: So called “Roster Filter”. Used to find names of all “shared roster” groups. See also the ldap_groupattr parameter. If unspecified, defaults to the top-level parameter of the same name. You must specify it in some place in the configuration, there is no default.

ldap_ufilter: “User Filter” – used for retrieving the human-readable name of roster entries (usually full names of people in the roster). See also the parameters ldap_userdesc and ldap_useruid. If unspecified, defaults to the top-level parameter of the same name. If that one also is unspecified, then the filter is assembled from values of other parameters as follows ([ldap_SOMETHING] is used to mean “the value of the configuration parameter ldap_SOMETHING”):

    (&(&([ldap_memberattr]=[ldap_memberattr_format])([ldap_groupattr]=%g))[ldap_filter])

Subsequently `%u` and `%g` are replaced with a \*.
This means that given the defaults, the filter sent to the LDAP
server is would be `(&(memberUid=*)(cn=*))`. If however the
`ldap_memberattr_format` is something like
`uid=%u,ou=People,o=org`, then the filter will be
`(&(memberUid=uid=*,ou=People,o=org)(cn=*))`.

ldap_gfilter: “Group Filter” – used when retrieving human-readable name (a.k.a. “Display Name”) and the members of a group. See also the parameters ldap_groupattr, ldap_groupdesc and ldap_memberattr. If unspecified, defaults to the top-level parameter of the same name. If that one also is unspecified, then the filter is constructed exactly in the same way as User Filter.

ldap_filter: Additional filter which is AND-ed together with User Filter and Group Filter. If unspecified, defaults to the top-level parameter of the same name. If that one is also unspecified, then no additional filter is merged with the other filters.

Note that you will probably need to manually define the User and Group Filter (since the auto-assembled ones will not work) if:

  • your ldap_memberattr_format is anything other than a simple %u,

  • and the attribute specified with ldap_memberattr does not support substring matches.

An example where it is the case is OpenLDAP and (unique)MemberName attribute from the groupOf(Unique)Names objectClass. A symptom of this problem is that you will see messages such as the following in your slapd.log:

get_filter: unknown filter type=130
filter="(&(?=undefined)(?=undefined)(something=else))"

Attributes

These parameters specify the names of the attributes which hold interesting data in the entries returned by running filters specified in section Filters.

ldap_groupattr: The name of the attribute that holds the group name, and that is used to differentiate between them. Retrieved from results of the “Roster Filter” and “Group Filter”. Defaults to cn.

ldap_groupdesc: The name of the attribute which holds the human-readable group name in the objects you use to represent groups. Retrieved from results of the “Group Filter”. Defaults to whatever ldap_groupattr is set.

ldap_memberattr: The name of the attribute which holds the IDs of the members of a group. Retrieved from results of the “Group Filter”. Defaults to memberUid.

The name of the attribute differs depending on the
`objectClass` you use for your group objects, for example:

    `posixGroup` -> `memberUid`
    `groupOfNames` -> `member`
    `groupOfUniqueNames` -> `uniqueMember`

ldap_userdesc: The name of the attribute which holds the human-readable user name. Retrieved from results of the “User Filter”. Defaults to cn.

ldap_useruid: The name of the attribute which holds the ID of a roster item. Value of this attribute in the roster item objects needs to match the ID retrieved from the ldap_memberattr attribute of a group object. Retrieved from results of the “User Filter”. Defaults to cn.

Control parameters

These paramters control the behaviour of the module.

ldap_memberattr_format: A globbing format for extracting user ID from the value of the attribute named by ldap_memberattr. Defaults to %u, which means that the whole value is the member ID. If you change it to something different, you may also need to specify the User and Group Filters manually — see section Filters.

ldap_memberattr_format_re: A regex for extracting user ID from the value of the attribute named by ldap_memberattr.

An example value
`“CN=(\\w*),(OU=.*,)*DC=company,DC=com”`
works for user IDs such as the following:

-   `CN=Romeo,OU=Montague,DC=company,DC=com`
-   `CN=Abram,OU=Servants,OU=Montague,DC=company,DC=com`
-   `CN=Juliet,OU=Capulet,DC=company,DC=com`
-   `CN=Peter,OU=Servants,OU=Capulet,DC=company,DC=com`

In case:

-   the option is unset,
-   or the `re` module in unavailable in the current
    Erlang environment,
-   or the regular expression does not compile,

then instead of a regular expression, a simple format specified by
`ldap_memberattr_format` is used. Also, in the last two
cases an error message is logged during the module initialization.

Also, note that in all cases `ldap_memberattr_format`
(and `*not*` the regex version) is used for constructing
the default “User/Group Filter” — see section [Filters](#msrl-filters).

ldap_auth_check: Whether the module should check (via the ejabberd authentication subsystem) for existence of each user in the shared LDAP roster. See section mod_shared_roster_ldap form more information. Set to off if you want to disable the check. Defaults to on.

ldap_user_cache_validity: Number of seconds for which the cache for roster item full names is considered fresh after retrieval. 300 by default. See section mod_shared_roster_ldap on how it is used during roster retrieval.

ldap_group_cache_validity: Number of seconds for which the cache for group membership is considered fresh after retrieval. 300 by default. See section mod_shared_roster_ldap on how it is used during roster retrieval.

Connection parameters

The module also accepts the connection parameters, all of which default to the top-level parameter of the same name, if unspecified. See LDAP Connection] for more information about them.

Retrieving the roster

When the module is called to retrieve the shared roster for a user, the following algorithm is used:

  1. [step:rfilter] A list of names of groups to display is created: the Roster Filter is run against the base DN, retrieving the values of the attribute named by ldap_groupattr.

  2. Unless the group cache is fresh (see the ldap_group_cache_validity option), it is refreshed:

    1. Information for all groups is retrieved using a single query: the Group Filter is run against the Base DN, retrieving the values of attributes named by ldap_groupattr (group ID), ldap_groupdesc (group “Display Name”) and ldap_memberattr (IDs of group members).

    2. group “Display Name”, read from the attribute named by ldap_groupdesc, is stored in the cache for the given group

    3. the following processing takes place for each retrieved value of attribute named by ldap_memberattr:

      1. the user ID part of it is extracted using ldap_memberattr_format(_re),

      2. then (unless ldap_auth_check is set to off) for each found user ID, the module checks (using the ejabberd authentication subsystem) whether such user exists in the given virtual host. It is skipped if the check is enabled and fails.

        This step is here for historical reasons. If you have a tidy DIT and properly defined “Roster Filter” and “Group Filter”, it is safe to disable it by setting ldap_auth_check to off — it will speed up the roster retrieval.

      3. the user ID is stored in the list of members in the cache for the given group

  3. For each item (group name) in the list of groups retrieved in step [step:rfilter]:

    1. the display name of a shared roster group is retrieved from the group cache

    2. for each IDs of users which belong to the group, retrieved from the group cache:

      1. the ID is skipped if it’s the same as the one for which we are retrieving the roster. This is so that the user does not have himself in the roster.

      2. the display name of a shared roster user is retrieved:

        1. first, unless the user name cache is fresh (see the ldap_user_cache_validity option), it is refreshed by running the User Filter, against the Base DN, retrieving the values of attributes named by ldap_useruid and ldap_userdesc.

        2. then, the display name for the given user ID is retrieved from the user name cache.

Configuration examples

Since there are many possible DIT layouts, it will probably be easiest to understand how to configure the module by looking at an example for a given DIT (or one resembling it).

Flat DIT

This seems to be the kind of DIT for which this module was initially designed. Basically there are just user objects, and group membership is stored in an attribute individually for each user. For example in a layout shown in figure [fig:msrl-dit-flat], the group of each user is stored in its ou attribute.

Such layout has a few downsides, including:

  • information duplication – the group name is repeated in every member object

  • difficult group management – information about group members is not centralized, but distributed between member objects

  • inefficiency – the list of unique group names has to be computed by iterating over all users

This however seems to be a common DIT layout, so the module keeps supporting it. You can use the following configuration…

modules:
  ...
  mod_shared_roster_ldap:
    ldap_base: "ou=flat,dc=nodomain"
    ldap_rfilter: "(objectClass=inetOrgPerson)"
    ldap_groupattr: "ou"
    ldap_memberattr: "cn"
    ldap_filter: "(objectClass=inetOrgPerson)"
    ldap_userdesc: "displayName"
  ...

…to be provided with a roster as shown in figure [fig:msrl-roster-flat] upon connecting as user czesio.

Deep DIT

This type of DIT contains distinctly typed objects for users and groups – see figure [fig:msrl-dit-deep]. They are shown separated into different subtrees, but it’s not a requirement.

If you use the following example module configuration with it:

modules:
  ...
  mod_shared_roster_ldap:
    ldap_base: "ou=deep,dc=nodomain"
    ldap_rfilter: "(objectClass=groupOfUniqueNames)"
    ldap_filter: ""
    ldap_gfilter: "(&(objectClass=groupOfUniqueNames)(cn=%g))"
    ldap_groupdesc: "description"
    ldap_memberattr: "uniqueMember"
    ldap_memberattr_format: "cn=%u,ou=people,ou=deep,dc=nodomain"
    ldap_ufilter: "(&(objectClass=inetOrgPerson)(cn=%u))"
    ldap_userdesc: "displayName"
  ...

…and connect as user czesio, then ejabberd will provide you with the roster shown in figure [fig:msrl-roster-deep].

mod_sic

This module adds support for Server IP Check (XEP-0279). This protocol enables a client to discover its external IP address.

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for urn:xmpp:sic:0 IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

mod_sip

This module adds SIP proxy/registrar support for the corresponding virtual host. Note that it is not enough to just load this module only. You should also configure listeners and DNS records properly. See section SIP for the full explanation.

Example configuration:

modules:
  ...
  mod_sip: {}
  ...

Options:

record_route: SIP_URI: When the option always_record_route is set or when SIP outbound is utilized RFC 5626, ejabberd inserts Record-Route header field with this SIP_URI into a SIP message. The default is SIP URI constructed from the virtual host.

always_record_route: true|false: Always insert Record-Route header into SIP messages. This approach allows to bypass NATs/firewalls a bit more easily. The default is true.

routes: [SIP_URI]: You can set a list of SIP URIs of routes pointing to this proxy server. The default is a list of a SIP URI constructed from the virtual host.

flow_timeout_udp: Seconds: For SIP outbound UDP connections set a keep-alive timer to Seconds. The default is 29.

flow_timeout_tcp: Seconds: For SIP outbound TCP connections set a keep-alive timer to Seconds. The default is 120.

via: [{type: Type, host: Host, port: Port}]: With this option for every Type you can specify Host and Port to set in Via header of outgoing SIP messages, where Type can be udp, tcp or tls. Host is a string and Port is a non negative integer. This is useful if you’re running your server in a non-standard network topology.

Example complex configuration:

modules:
  ...
  mod_sip:
    always_record_route: false
    record_route: sip:example.com;lr
    routes:
      - sip:example.com;lr
      - sip:sip.example.com;lr
    flow_timeout_udp: 30
    flow_timeout_tcp: 130
    via:
      -
        type: tls
        host: "sip-tls.example.com"
        port: 5061
      -
        type: tcp
        host: "sip-tcp.example.com"
        port: 5060
      -
        type: udp
        host: "sip-udp.example.com"
        port: 5060
  ...

mod_stats

This module adds support for Statistics Gathering (XEP-0039). This protocol allows you to retrieve next statistics from your ejabberd deployment:

  • Total number of registered users on the current virtual host (users/total).

  • Total number of registered users on all virtual hosts (users/all-hosts/total).

  • Total number of online users on the current virtual host (users/online).

  • Total number of online users on all virtual hosts (users/all-hosts/online).

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Statistics Gathering (http://jabber.org/protocol/stats) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

As there are only a small amount of clients (for example Tkabber) and software libraries with support for this XEP, a few examples are given of the XML you need to send in order to get the statistics. Here they are:

  • You can request the number of online users on the current virtual host (example.org) by sending:

    <iq to='example.org' type='get'>
      <query xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/stats'>
        <stat name='users/online'/>
      </query>
    </iq>
    
  • You can request the total number of registered users on all virtual hosts by sending:

    <iq to='example.org' type='get'>
      <query xmlns='http://jabber.org/protocol/stats'>
        <stat name='users/all-hosts/total'/>
      </query>
    </iq>
    

mod_time

This module features support for Entity Time (XEP-0202). By using this XEP, you are able to discover the time at another entity’s location.

Options:

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Entity Time (jabber:iq:time) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

mod_vcard

This module allows end users to store and retrieve their vCard, and to retrieve other users vCards, as defined in vcard-temp (XEP-0054). The module also implements an uncomplicated Jabber User Directory based on the vCards of these users. Moreover, it enables the server to send its vCard when queried.

Options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘vjud.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for vcard-temp IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

search: true|false: This option specifies whether the search functionality is enabled or not. If disabled, the option host will be ignored and the Jabber User Directory service will not appear in the Service Discovery item list. The default value is false.

matches: infinity|Number: With this option, the number of reported search results can be limited. If the option’s value is set to infinity, all search results are reported. The default value is 30.

allow_return_all: false|true: This option enables you to specify if search operations with empty input fields should return all users who added some information to their vCard. The default value is false.

search_all_hosts, true|false: If this option is set to true, search operations will apply to all virtual hosts. Otherwise only the current host will be searched. The default value is true. This option is available in mod_vcard when using Mnesia, but not when using SQL storage.

Examples:

  • In this first situation, search results are limited to twenty items, every user who added information to their vCard will be listed when people do an empty search, and only users from the current host will be returned:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_vcard:
        search: true
        matches: 20
        allow_return_all: true
        search_all_hosts: false
      ...
    
  • The second situation differs in a way that search results are not limited, and that all virtual hosts will be searched instead of only the current one:

    modules:
      ...
      mod_vcard:
        search: true
        matches: infinity
        allow_return_all: true
      ...
    

mod_vcard_ldap

ejabberd can map LDAP attributes to vCard fields. This behaviour is implemented in the mod_vcard_ldap module. This module does not depend on the authentication method (see LDAP Authentication).

Usually ejabberd treats LDAP as a read-only storage: it is possible to consult data, but not possible to create accounts or edit vCard that is stored in LDAP. However, it is possible to change passwords if mod_register module is enabled and LDAP server supports RFC 3062.

The mod_vcard_ldap module has its own optional parameters. The first group of parameters has the same meaning as the top-level LDAP parameters to set the authentication method: ldap_servers, ldap_port, ldap_rootdn, ldap_password, ldap_base, ldap_uids, ldap_deref_aliases and ldap_filter. See section LDAP Authentication for detailed information about these options. If one of these options is not set, ejabberd will look for the top-level option with the same name.

The second group of parameters consists of the following mod_vcard_ldap-specific options:

host: HostName: This option defines the Jabber ID of the service. If the host option is not specified, the Jabber ID will be the hostname of the virtual host with the prefix ‘vjud.’. The keyword “@HOST@” is replaced at start time with the real virtual host name.

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for vcard-temp IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).

search: true|false: This option specifies whether the search functionality is enabled (value: true) or disabled (value: false). If disabled, the option host will be ignored and the Jabber User Directory service will not appear in the Service Discovery item list. The default value is false.

matches: infinity|Number: With this option, the number of reported search results can be limited. If the option’s value is set to infinity, all search results are reported. The default value is 30.

ldap_vcard_map: {Name: {Pattern, LDAPattributes}, ...}: With this option you can set the table that maps LDAP attributes to vCard fields. Name is the type name of the vCard as defined in RFC 2426. Pattern is a string which contains pattern variables %u, %d or %s. LDAPattributes is the list containing LDAP attributes. The pattern variables %s will be sequentially replaced with the values of LDAP attributes from List_of_LDAP_attributes, %u will be replaced with the user part of a JID, and %d will be replaced with the domain part of a JID. The default is:

    "NICKNAME": {"%u": []}
    "FN": {"%s": ["displayName"]}
    "LAST": {"%s": ["sn"]}
    "FIRST": {"%s": ["givenName"]}
    "MIDDLE": {"%s": ["initials"]}
    "ORGNAME": {"%s": ["o"]}
    "ORGUNIT": {"%s": ["ou"]}
    "CTRY": {"%s": ["c"]}
    "LOCALITY": {"%s": ["l"]}
    "STREET": {"%s": ["street"]}
    "REGION": {"%s": ["st"]}
    "PCODE": {"%s": ["postalCode"]}
    "TITLE": {"%s": ["title"]}
    "URL": {"%s": ["labeleduri"]}
    "DESC": {"%s": ["description"]}
    "TEL": {"%s": ["telephoneNumber"]}
    "EMAIL": {"%s": ["mail"]}
    "BDAY": {"%s": ["birthDay"]}
    "ROLE": {"%s": ["employeeType"]}
    "PHOTO": {"%s": ["jpegPhoto"]}

ldap_search_fields: {Name: Attribute, ...}: This option defines the search form and the LDAP attributes to search within. Name is the name of a search form field which will be automatically translated by using the translation files (see msgs/*.msg for available words). Attribute is the LDAP attribute or the pattern %u. The default is:

    "User": "%u"
    "Full Name": "displayName"
    "Given Name": "givenName"
    "Middle Name": "initials"
    "Family Name": "sn"
    "Nickname": "%u"
    "Birthday": "birthDay"
    "Country": "c"
    "City": "l"
    "Email": "mail"
    "Organization Name": "o"
    "Organization Unit": "ou"

ldap_search_reported: {SearchField: VcardField}, ...}: This option defines which search fields should be reported. SearchField is the name of a search form field which will be automatically translated by using the translation files (see msgs/*.msg for available words). VcardField is the vCard field name defined in the ldap_vcard_map option. The default is:

    "Full Name": "FN"
    "Given Name": "FIRST"
    "Middle Name": "MIDDLE"
    "Family Name": "LAST"
    "Nickname": "NICKNAME"
    "Birthday": "BDAY"
    "Country": "CTRY"
    "City": "LOCALITY"
    "Email": "EMAIL"
    "Organization Name": "ORGNAME"
    "Organization Unit": "ORGUNIT"

Examples:

  • Let’s say ldap.example.org is the name of our LDAP server. We have users with their passwords in ou=Users,dc=example,dc=org directory. Also we have addressbook, which contains users emails and their additional infos in ou=AddressBook,dc=example,dc=org directory. Corresponding authentication section should looks like this:

    ## authentication method
    auth_method: ldap
    ## DNS name of our LDAP server
    ldap_servers:
      - "ldap.example.org"
    ## We want to authorize users from 'shadowAccount' object class only
    ldap_filter: "(objectClass=shadowAccount)"
    

    Now we want to use users LDAP-info as their vCards. We have four attributes defined in our LDAP schema: mail — email address, givenName — first name, sn — second name, birthDay — birthday. Also we want users to search each other. Let’s see how we can set it up:

    modules:
      mod_vcard_ldap:
        ## We use the same server and port, but want to bind anonymously because
        ## our LDAP server accepts anonymous requests to
        ## "ou=AddressBook,dc=example,dc=org" subtree.
        ldap_rootdn: ""
        ldap_password: ""
        ## define the addressbook's base
        ldap_base: "ou=AddressBook,dc=example,dc=org"
        ## uidattr: user's part of JID is located in the "mail" attribute
        ## uidattr_format: common format for our emails
        ldap_uids: {"mail": "%u@mail.example.org"}
        ## Now we want to define vCard pattern
        ldap_vcard_map:
          "NICKNAME": {"%u": []} # just use user's part of JID as his nickname
          "FIRST": {"%s": ["givenName"]}
          "LAST": {"%s": ["sn"]}
          "FN": {"%s, %s": ["sn", "givenName"]} # example: "Smith, John"
          "EMAIL": {"%s": ["mail"]}
          "BDAY": {"%s": ["birthDay"]}
        ## Search form
        ldap_search_fields:
          "User": "%u"
          "Name": "givenName"
          "Family Name": "sn"
          "Email": "mail"
          "Birthday": "birthDay"
        ## vCard fields to be reported
        ## Note that JID is always returned with search results
        ldap_search_reported:
          "Full Name": "FN"
          "Nickname": "NICKNAME"
          "Birthday": "BDAY"
    

    Note that mod_vcard_ldap module checks an existence of the user before searching his info in LDAP.

  • ldap_vcard_map example:

    ldap_vcard_map:
      "NICKNAME": {"%u": []} # just use user's part of JID as his nickname
      "FN": {"%s": ["displayName"]}
      "CTRY": {"Russia": []}
      "EMAIL": {"%u@%d": []}
      "DESC": {"%s\n%s": ["title", "description"]}
    
  • ldap_search_fields example:

    ldap_search_fields:
      "User": "uid"
      "Full Name": "displayName"
      "Email": "mail"
    
  • ldap_search_reported example:

    ldap_search_reported:
      "Full Name": "FN"
      "Email": "EMAIL"
      "Birthday": "BDAY"
      "Nickname": "NICKNAME"
    

mod_vcard_xupdate

The user’s client can store an avatar in the user vCard. The vCard-Based Avatars protocol (XEP-0153) provides a method for clients to inform the contacts what is the avatar hash value. However, simple or small clients may not implement that protocol.

If this module is enabled, all the outgoing client presence stanzas get automatically the avatar hash on behalf of the client. So, the contacts receive the presence stanzas with the Update Data described in XEP-0153 as if the client would had inserted it itself. If the client had already included such element in the presence stanza, it is replaced with the element generated by ejabberd.

By enabling this module, each vCard modification produces a hash recalculation, and each presence sent by a client produces hash retrieval and a presence stanza rewrite. For this reason, enabling this module will introduce a computational overhead in servers with clients that change frequently their presence.

Options:

db_type: mnesia|sql|riak: Define the type of storage where the module will create the tables and store user information. The default is the storage defined by the global option default_db, or mnesia if omitted. If sql or riak value is defined, make sure you have defined the database, see database.

mod_version

This module implements Software Version (XEP-0092). Consequently, it answers ejabberd’s version when queried.

Options:

show_os: true|false: Should the operating system be revealed or not. The default value is true.

iqdisc: Discipline: This specifies the processing discipline for Software Version (jabber:iq:version) IQ queries (see section IQ Discipline Option).